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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Anza-Borrego Desert State Park in San Diego County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

Pictographs

What Do They Mean?

 
 
Pictographs Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Baker, March 13, 2022
1. Pictographs Marker
Inscription.  
Like all art, the pictographs painted on desert bedrock along this trail have the power to stir the imagination. What do these symbols mean? Who created them? When and why?
It's hard to answer those questions with certainty. Hundreds of years have passed since native artists had their inspiration. A few details, however, suggest explanations.
Color is important. In the native artists' culture, red is often a "female" color, while black is "male." Sites like this might be part of growing up. Young Indians, both boys and girls, went through initiation rites. Some pictographs appear to be related to vision or spirit helper.
It's important to preserve these pictographs. Not only are they sacrec to contemporary Kumeyaay, but the can be an emotional link between past and present for everyone. Inspiration, artistic expression, and curiosity are universal. Enjoy and imagine.

Pictographs are still found in sheltered locations at several sites in the Park. Considered sacred by native peoples, they survived for hundreds of years. Help ensure that they're not damaged or lost in the 21st century. Take photos,
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"In preparing red paint, the artist used hematite or red iron oxide and the oil of roasted wild cucumber kernels ... To make black paint, wild cucumber seeds were roasted and charred on a piece of burning oak bark, then ground and mixed [with] manganese oxide or charcoal. Yellow paint was made from yellow ochre or limonite, and white came from white ash or gypsum deposits..."
—The Forgotten Artist, Manfred Knaak
 
Erected by California State Parks.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Anthropology & ArchaeologyArts, Letters, MusicNative Americans.
 
Location. 33° 1.181′ N, 116° 21.588′ W. Marker is in Anza-Borrego Desert State Park, California, in San Diego County. Marker is on Pictographs Trailhead road, 1.4 miles east of Little Blair Valley Road. High ground clearance vehicle required. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Julian CA 92036, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 11 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Morteros Memories (approx. 1.3 miles away); Butterfield Overland Mail Route (approx. 2.8 miles away); Vallecito Stage Station (approx. 3.1 miles away); Box Canyon (approx. 4.8 miles away); Vallecito-Butterfield Stage Station
Pictographs Marker and Trail image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Baker, March 13, 2022
2. Pictographs Marker and Trail
(approx. 8.6 miles away); San Felipe (approx. 9.2 miles away); Palm Spring (approx. 10.7 miles away); Pedro Fages Trail (approx. 10.7 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Anza-Borrego Desert State Park.
 
Pictographs Trailhead Signs image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Baker, March 13, 2022
3. Pictographs Trailhead Signs
Pictographs image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Baker, March 13, 2022
4. Pictographs
On the large boulder, at far left. This location is one mile from the marker.
Pictographs image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Baker, March 13, 2022
5. Pictographs
Pictographs image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Baker, March 13, 2022
6. Pictographs
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2022. It was originally submitted on June 15, 2022, by Craig Baker of Sylmar, California. This page has been viewed 501 times since then and 15 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on June 15, 2022, by Craig Baker of Sylmar, California.

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Feb. 21, 2024