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Fort Stockton in Pecos County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

The Great Comanche War Trail

 
 
The Great Comanche War Trail Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, July 3, 2022
1. The Great Comanche War Trail Marker
Inscription.  The Comanche War Trail: Every September since the late 18th century, around the full moon or "Comanche Moon," the Great Comanche War Trail, which came directly through the town where you stand today, brought huge numbers of Comanches on a north-south path up to a mile wide. It began in the Southern Plains, crossing the Pecos River at Horsehead Crossing, on to Comanche Springs, then southbound into Mexico. In some areas, the wide, deeply rutted trail is visible today.

A map of West Texas made by J.H. Young in 1857 shows such a trail. The lower portion had two prongs, one crossing the Rio Grande about the vicinity of Boquillas and the other at Presidio. The two converged at Comanche Springs, near the site of Fort Stockton. From this point the trail extended north to cross the Pecos at or near Horsehead Crossing and continued northeasterly across the sand hills to the Comanche's permanent homes on the plains.

"There was no way to hide or cover the great trail itself. It was worn deep by the tracks of countless travelers - man and beast - and whitened by the bones of animals. It was a great chalk line on the
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map of West Texas from the Llano Estacado to the Rio Grande."
S.D. Myres: PS, FL

Many Indian tribes inhabited the trans-pecos area of Texas including the Apache, Kiowa and Kickapoo. However, the Comanche displaced these tribes when they moved into the area by way of the Comanche War Trail. The silhouettes seen here represent a Comanche hunting party approaching Comanche Springs. The artist for all of the silhouettes at the Fort Stockton Visitor Center is Brian Norwood of Jal, New Mexico.
 
Erected by Fort Stockton Convention & Visitors Bureau.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Forts and CastlesNative AmericansWars, US Indian. A significant historical year for this entry is 1857.
 
Location. 30° 53.68′ N, 102° 52.727′ W. Marker is in Fort Stockton, Texas, in Pecos County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Railroad Avenue and North Main Street. The marker is located at the northwest section of the Fort Stockton Visitor Center. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1000 Railroad Avenue, Fort Stockton TX 79735, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Comanche Springs (a few steps from this marker); The 9th Cavalry, Fort Stockton and Edward Hatch (within shouting distance of this marker); Pecos County Fort Stockton Renewable Energy Park
The Great Comanche War Trail Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, July 3, 2022
2. The Great Comanche War Trail Marker
(within shouting distance of this marker); Visitor Center (within shouting distance of this marker); Oil and Gas Industry in Pecos County (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); The "Prairie Schooner" and Early Settlers (about 400 feet away); Downtown Fort Stockton (about 700 feet away); Old Fort Cemetery (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Fort Stockton.
 
Also see . . .  Comanche Trail. Texas State Historical Association (Submitted on July 5, 2022, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.) 
 
Closeup of the Comanche War Trail Map from the marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, July 3, 2022
3. Closeup of the Comanche War Trail Map from the marker
The view of the Great Comanche War Trail Marker from the parking lot area image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, July 3, 2022
4. The view of the Great Comanche War Trail Marker from the parking lot area
The view of the markers from the visitors center. image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, July 3, 2022
5. The view of the markers from the visitors center.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 5, 2022. It was originally submitted on July 4, 2022, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. This page has been viewed 178 times since then and 41 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on July 5, 2022, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.

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Jun. 16, 2024