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Fort Stockton in Pecos County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

The 9th Cavalry, Fort Stockton and Edward Hatch

 
 
The 9th Cavalry, Fort Stockton and Edward Hatch Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, July 3, 2022
1. The 9th Cavalry, Fort Stockton and Edward Hatch Marker
Inscription.  Military presence began here with the establishment of Camp Stockton in 1858 by troops of the 1st and 8th Infantry, US Army. It was named for Commodore Robert Field Stockton, a naval officer who distinguished himself during the Mexican War. This first site was southwest of the present location, near the present Courthouse.

The post protected travelers and settlers on the numerous roads and trails that made use of the abundant water supply of Comanche Springs. It was here at the springs that these trails crossed the Comanche War Trail.

The US Army withdrew from Texas during the Civil War and abandoned Camp Stockton in 1861. Confederate troops briefly occupied the site until they too, withdrew. By the end of the war little remained of this first post. In July 1867, Colonel Edward Hatch, Commander of the 9th Cavalry, re-established Fort Stockton at its present location.

Nearly sixteen months after the end of the Civil War, Section 3 of an Act of Congress entitled "An Act to increase and fix the Military Peace Establishment of the United States" authorized the formation of two regiments of cavalry composed of "colored"
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men. The act was approved on 28 July 1866. On 21 September 1866, the 9th Cavalry Regiment was activated at Greenville, Louisiana, and the 10th Cavalry Regiment was activated at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. Under the competent leadership of Colonels Edward Hatch and Benjamin Grierson, first Regimental Commanders of the 9th and 10th Cavalry Regiments, respectively, both regiments were trained and equipped and began a long and proud history.

The 9th cavalry, under the leadership of Colonel Edward Hatch, established their first headquarters at Fort Stockton in July 1867, when the fort was reoccupied following the Civil War. The 9th was joined by the 24th and 25th Infantry Regiments and later by the 10th Cavalry Regiment. These regiments proudly accepted the name given to them by their Indian adversaries - Buffalo Soldiers. It was an honor bestowed in admiration, as the Native Americans considered the buffalo to have noble attributes such as strength and stamina.

West Texas was home to the Comanche and Apache. Displaced from their homelands and nomadic way of life, these bands rejected reservation life. Ruthless foes, these warriors roamed and raided throughout the region in small parties nearly impossible to snare. However this duty fell to the Buffalo Soldiers of the 9th Cavalry stationed at Fort Stockton.

Several of the original Officer's Quarters as
The 9th Cavalry, Fort Stockton and Edward Hatch Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, July 3, 2022
2. The 9th Cavalry, Fort Stockton and Edward Hatch Marker
well as the Guard House are located at the Historic Fort Stockton Site. The City of Fort Stockton has reconstructed two of the enlisted men's barracks and two kitchens. These buildings house exhibits and artifacts related to the historic fort. Please take time to visit the Historic Fort Grounds while you are here in Fort Stockton. Maps for the Historic Tour are available at the Visitor Center.

Colonel Edward Hatch

White officers commanded the Buffalo Soldier regiments, although most white officers shunned service with these units. Colonel Hatch respected his men and they served him well as they buit Fort Stockton and protected Far West Texas.

Edward Hatch was born in Bangor, Maine on December 22, 1832. He was educated at Norwich Military Academy in Vermont, and did not attend West Point. At the outbreak of the Civil War he volunteered for the Union Army becoming colonel of the 2nd Iowa Cavaley Regiment in June 1962. He participated in the famous Grierson Raid around the defenses of Vicksburg and was selected to organise and train the 9th Cavalry after the War. Talented, competent, tolerant and ever ready to defend the honor of his men, Hatch was a perfect match for the 9th. Hatch died at Fort Robinson, Nebraska on April 11, 1889. The town of Hatch, New Mexico Bears his name.

 
Erected by
The view of the 9th Cavalry, Fort Stockton and Edward Hatch Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, July 3, 2022
3. The view of the 9th Cavalry, Fort Stockton and Edward Hatch Marker
Fort Stockton Convention & Visitors Bureau.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: African AmericansForts and CastlesNative AmericansWars, US Indian. A significant historical date for this entry is April 11, 1889.
 
Location. 30° 53.68′ N, 102° 52.71′ W. Marker is in Fort Stockton, Texas, in Pecos County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Railroad Avenue and East 11th Street. The marker is located at the northwest section of the Fort Stockton Visitor Center. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1000 Railroad Avenue, Fort Stockton TX 79735, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Pecos County Fort Stockton Renewable Energy Park (here, next to this marker); Comanche Springs (a few steps from this marker); The Great Comanche War Trail (within shouting distance of this marker); Visitor Center (within shouting distance of this marker); Oil and Gas Industry in Pecos County (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); The "Prairie Schooner" and Early Settlers (about 300 feet away); Downtown Fort Stockton (about 800 feet away); Old Fort Cemetery (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Fort Stockton.
 
Also see . . .
1. Ninth United States Cavalry. Texas State Historical Association (Submitted on July 5, 2022, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.)
The view of the nearby Fort Stockton’s Officer’s Quarters image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, July 3, 2022
4. The view of the nearby Fort Stockton’s Officer’s Quarters
 

2. Edward Hatch. Wikipedia (Submitted on July 5, 2022, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.) 

3. Fort Stockton. Texas State Historical Association (Submitted on July 5, 2022, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.) 
 
Brigadier General Edward Hatch during the Civil War image. Click for full size.
Public Domain, circa 1860s
5. Brigadier General Edward Hatch during the Civil War
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 5, 2022. It was originally submitted on July 4, 2022, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. This page has been viewed 239 times since then and 137 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on July 5, 2022, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.

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Jul. 15, 2024