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Ocala in Marion County, Florida — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

The Second Seminole War / The Third Seminole War

Fort King National Historic Landmark

 
 
The Second and Third Seminole Wars Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Brandon D Cross, July 4, 2022
1. The Second and Third Seminole Wars Marker
Inscription.  
The Second Seminole War
After years of managing conflicts between the American settlers and Native Americans all along the east coast, the United States government passed the Indian Removal Act of 1830 which sought to relocate all Native Americans to newly established Indian Territory west of the Mississippi River. In Florida this meant the Seminole were once again to be displaced. Tensions rose and fighting began with the Seminole attack on Major Francis Dade and his troops who were en route to Fort King, and the almost simultaneous killing of the Indian Removal Agent, Wiley Thompson, and others at Fort King in December 1835. For seven years the warfare continued, eventually resulting in the removal of most of the Seminole population to Oklahoma. It was during this conflict that Osceola and Micanopy were captured by the U.S. Army under a false flag of truce. At the end of the war in 1842, a few hundred Seminole were permitted to remain in South Florida.

The Third Seminole War
Settlers continued to push farther and farther south into the state, putting more pressure on the Seminole and
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making it nearly impossible for them to survive. The U.S. Army destroyed a Seminole plantation west of the Everglades in December 1855. The Seminole retaliated with an attack near Fort Myers. This set into motion the balance of the Seminole War which consisted mainly of minor raids. Many more Seminole, who had either surrendered or been captured, were relocated to Oklahoma. Those that remained lived deep in the Everglades and the Big Cypress Swamp - land that the white settlers did not want.

A lengthy conflict aggravated by broken promises and failed negotiations, the Seminole War spanned More Than Four Decades

Second Seminole War 1835-1842 / Third Seminole War1855-1858

 
Erected by Florida Department of State/Division of Historical Resources.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Forts and CastlesNative AmericansWars, US Indian. A significant historical year for this entry is 1835.
 
Location. 29° 11.232′ N, 82° 4.959′ W. Marker is in Ocala, Florida, in Marion County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of East Fort King Street and SE 39th Avenue, on the left when traveling east. Marker is located on the grounds of the Fort King National Historic Landmark. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 3925 E Fort King St, Ocala FL 34470, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers.
The Second and Third Seminole Wars Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Brandon D Cross, July 4, 2022
2. The Second and Third Seminole Wars Marker
At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The First Seminole War (here, next to this marker); The Seminole War (here, next to this marker); A Tale of Two Forts (a few steps from this marker); The Second Fort (a few steps from this marker); Fort King (a few steps from this marker); Fort King Road (within shouting distance of this marker); The U.S. Army on the frontier (within shouting distance of this marker); It was a Hard Life at Fort King (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Ocala.
 
Also see . . .
1. The Second Seminole War. (Submitted on July 8, 2022, by Brandon D Cross of Flagler Beach, Florida.)
2. The Third Seminole War. (Submitted on July 8, 2022, by Brandon D Cross of Flagler Beach, Florida.)
3. Fort King National Historic Landmark. (Submitted on July 8, 2022, by Brandon D Cross of Flagler Beach, Florida.)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 9, 2022. It was originally submitted on July 8, 2022, by Brandon D Cross of Flagler Beach, Florida. This page has been viewed 91 times since then and 6 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on July 8, 2022, by Brandon D Cross of Flagler Beach, Florida. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.

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Mar. 3, 2024