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Near Sheffield in Crockett County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Battle at Fort Lancaster

The only Texas army post ever attacked by Indians

 
 
Battle at Fort Lancaster Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, July 2, 2022
1. Battle at Fort Lancaster Marker
Inscription.  On December 26, 1867, the 40 soldiers and officers of Company K, 9th Cavalry, were attacked at Fort Lancaster by an estimated 400 Kickapoo and their allies. The battle began when the teamster leading the horses to water, William Sharpe, was lassoed, dragged away, and killed. While the others turned the herd back to the fort, troopers Andrew Trimble and Eli Boyer were likewise killed.

At the fort the company formed a crescent-shaped skirmish line to face the enemy charging from the south, west, and north. The troopers' resolve and steady fire from their Spencer repeating rifles saved the day with no further losses. When the army horse herd stampeded during the battle, the attackers began to withdraw.

The Kickapoo Tribe
The Kickapoo were originally farmers and buffalo hunters from the Great Lakes region, but readily adapted to life on the Texas prairie. Today the tribe numbers over 2,500, living in Oklahoma, Nevada, Texas, and Mexico.

Buffalo Soldiers
American Indian tribes respected the fierce fighting ability of the African American soldiers and gave them the
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name "Buffalo Soldiers."

"Had this stampede not occurred, it is doubtful if the defense against such overwhelming odds could have been successful."
- Captain William Frohock

 
Erected by Fort Lancaster State Historic Site.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: African AmericansForts and CastlesNative AmericansWars, US Indian. A significant historical date for this entry is December 26, 1867.
 
Location. 30° 40.006′ N, 101° 41.821′ W. Marker is near Sheffield, Texas, in Crockett County. Marker can be reached from Fort Lancaster Road, half a mile north of U.S. 290. The marker is located in the northwest section of the fort. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 629 Fort Lancaster Road, Sheffield TX 79781, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. 'Quarter-Master' (within shouting distance of this marker); Company K Barracks (within shouting distance of this marker); Laundresses (within shouting distance of this marker); Commissary (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Officer's Quarters (about 300 feet away); Bakery (about 300 feet away); Company H Barracks (about 400 feet away); Ruins of Fort Lancaster (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Sheffield.
 
More about
Battle at Fort Lancaster Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, July 2, 2022
2. Battle at Fort Lancaster Marker
this marker.
The ruins of the fort and the markers are located on the grounds of the Fort Lancaster State Historic Site which requires a small entrance fee to access.
 
Also see . . .
1. Fort Lancaster State Historic Site. Texas Historical Commission (Submitted on July 10, 2022, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.) 

2. Kickapoo people. Wikipedia (Submitted on July 11, 2022, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.) 

3. Buffalo Soldier. Wikipedia (Submitted on July 11, 2022, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.) 

4. The Battle of Fort Lancaster–December 26, 1867. Texas Historical Commission (Submitted on July 11, 2022, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.) 
 
The view of the Battle at Fort Lancaster Marker near Company K Barracks image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, July 2, 2022
3. The view of the Battle at Fort Lancaster Marker near Company K Barracks
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 11, 2022. It was originally submitted on July 10, 2022, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. This page has been viewed 174 times since then and 11 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on July 10, 2022, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.   2, 3. submitted on July 11, 2022, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.

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Feb. 29, 2024