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Pinckney in Livingston County, Michigan — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Pinckney

 
 
Pinckney Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Joel Seewald, July 9, 2022
1. Pinckney Marker
Inscription.  
[The Village of Pinckney]...is in the midst of one of the finest and already best settled agricultural districts in the state, and is already the natural center of business for not less than two hundred or three hundred families.
William Kirkland

In 1835, William and Carolyn Kirkland moved their family from New York to Detroit. Caught up in land speculation fever, William purchased 1,400 acres in Putnam Township. Two years later, he platted a village and named it for his brother, Charles Pinckney Kirkland. The town soon had several shops, a temperance tavern and a grist mill to serve local farmers.

In 1839, Caroline wrote a novel, A New Home — Who'll Follow?, under the pen name Mrs. Mary Clavers. It was a successful, realistic account of her life as a settler in Michigan's wilderness. The family returned to New York City in 1843, and William died three years later. Caroline opened a girls school and worked as a magazine editor to support her family. She continued to write, and hosted writers such as Edgar Allen Poe and William Cullen Bryant in her home. Caroline died in 1864.
 
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2021 by Mike Levine Lakelands Trail, Michigan History Center, Michigan Department of Natural Resources.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Parks & Recreational AreasRailroads & StreetcarsSettlements & Settlers. A significant historical year for this entry is 1835.
 
Location. 42° 27.647′ N, 83° 56.562′ W. Marker is in Pinckney, Michigan, in Livingston County. Marker can be reached from Pearl Street north of East Hamburg Street, on the left when traveling north. Marker is about 200 feet west of Pearl Street on the Mike Levine Lakelands Trail. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Pinckney MI 48169, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 6 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. The Grieving Yard (approx. 2.9 miles away); Anderson (approx. 3½ miles away); Hitting the Road (approx. 3.8 miles away); Trains Off Line (approx. 4.6 miles away); Chain of Lakes (approx. 4.9 miles away); The Big Chill (approx. 5 miles away); Hudson Mills (approx. 5.4 miles away); Huron River (approx. 5.7 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Pinckney.
 
Also see . . .
1. Caroline Kirkland. Wikipedia article (Submitted on July 20, 2022, by Joel Seewald of Madison Heights, Michigan.) 

2. A New Home — Who'll Follow. Link to several versions of the book at the HathiTrust Digital Library. (Submitted on July 20, 2022, by Joel Seewald of Madison Heights, Michigan.) 

3. The Fresh Air Camp. Article in Michigan Today
Pinckney Marker — middle right image image. Click for full size.
Pinckney Library
2. Pinckney Marker — middle right image
The Pinckney Train Station and Freight House
In 1883, Grand Trunk Western Railroad built a station in Pinckney. A freight house, seen just beyond the depot in this photograph, was constructed the following year.

After the station was demolished in 1947, the freight house took its place as depot until 1976, when the railroad abandoned the line and building. In 2009, a group of Pinckney High School students, worried about the future of the neglected building, raised funds to help fund the building's renovation.
about the University of Michigan's Fresh Air Camp (March 6, 2019). (Submitted on July 20, 2022, by Joel Seewald of Madison Heights, Michigan.) 
 
Pinckney Marker — bottom left images image. Click for full size.
Pinckney Library
3. Pinckney Marker — bottom left images
A Changing Community
In the 1920s, Henry Ford proposed a factory in Pinckney as part of his village industries program. He purchased the mill and dam and paid for flowage rights until 1940, when the area's agricultural industry began to decline. Many farms were sold and replaced with summer homes.
Pinckney Marker — bottom middle images image. Click for full size.
Top: Ann Arbor News, Eck Stranger; bottom: Wayne State University Digital Collections
4. Pinckney Marker — bottom middle images
From 1921 to 1979, the University of Michigan ran a Fresh Air Camp for youth on nearby Patterson Lake.
Pinckney Marker — bottom right images image. Click for full size.
5. Pinckney Marker — bottom right images
Pinckney State Recreation Area
In 1944, the Michigan Department of Conservation purchased about 4,000 acres in the surrounding region to create the Pinckney State Recreation Area. Now, 11,000 acres, the area's natural beauty and vast array of wildlife attract visitors to its forests, campgrounds and trails.
Pinckney Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Joel Seewald, July 9, 2022
6. Pinckney Marker
View looking east toward Pearl Street along the Mike Levine Lakelands Trail. Pinckney trailhead parking is on the right.
Pinckney Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Joel Seewald, July 9, 2022
7. Pinckney Marker
View looking toward the west along the Mike Levine Lakelands Trail from Pearl Street.
Mike Levine Lakelands Trail State Park sign image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Joel Seewald, July 9, 2022
8. Mike Levine Lakelands Trail State Park sign
Sign at the Pinckney trailhead near the Pinckney marker.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 20, 2022. It was originally submitted on July 20, 2022, by Joel Seewald of Madison Heights, Michigan. This page has been viewed 179 times since then and 23 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. submitted on July 20, 2022, by Joel Seewald of Madison Heights, Michigan.

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Feb. 20, 2024