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Waco in McLennan County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Site of Waco Indian Village

 
 
Site of Waco Indian Village Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, August 4, 2022
1. Site of Waco Indian Village Marker
Inscription.  
On This Site
Stood the village of a semi-civilized tribe, the Waco Indians who made a treaty with Stephen F. Austin in 1824 but were driven out by Comanches about 1837 • From them the city of Waco, laid out by Major George B. Erath in 1849, takes its name

2nd Plaque
This marker, placed by the McLennan County Historical Commission on October 10, 2014, corrects an error on the original centennial marker. Further research has shown that it was the Cherokees, rather than the Comanches, who besieged the Wacos/Huacos Indians in 1829 - 1837, causing them to disperse gradually and move on to other areas.
 
Erected 1936 by State of Texas. (Marker Number 5692.)
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Native AmericansSettlements & Settlers. A significant historical date for this entry is October 10, 2014.
 
Location. 31° 33.529′ N, 97° 8.262′ W. Marker is in Waco, Texas, in McLennan County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Jefferson Avenue and Orman Street. The marker is located on the northeast
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section of the Taylor Museum of Waco History grounds. (behind museum building). Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 701 Jefferson Avenue, Waco TX 76701, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Grand Lodge of Texas, A.F & A.M. (approx. 0.2 miles away); New Hope Baptist Church (approx. 0.2 miles away); The C.C. McCulloch House (approx. ¼ mile away); First Lutheran Church (approx. ¼ mile away); McLennan County Courthouse (approx. ¼ mile away); The Courthouses of McLennan County (approx. ¼ mile away); Waco Theatre (approx. 0.4 miles away); Stratton Stricker Building (approx. 0.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Waco.
 
Also see . . .
1. Waco Indian Village. Waco History
Some accounts say that a band of Cherokee from East Texas raided the Waco Indian Village in 1829 in order to avenge some stolen horses. Others tell of a smallpox epidemic which devastated the village. Although it is not clear if these accounts speak specifically of this native settlement, it is known that a permanent Waco Indian village no longer existed upon the Brazos River after 1830. The loss of the village dealt a serious blow to the Waco Indians. Encroaching settlers forced them to move slowly farther and farther up the Brazos River. Source: Amanda Sawyer
(Submitted on August 8, 2022, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.)
The Site of Waco Indian Village and Marker under large old oak trees image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, August 4, 2022
2. The Site of Waco Indian Village and Marker under large old oak trees
 

2. Wichita people. Wikipedia
The Wichita lived in settled villages with domed-shaped, grass lodges, sometimes up to 30 feet (9.1 m) in diameter. The Wichita were successful hunters, farmers, traders, and negotiators. Their historical homelands stretched from San Antonio, Texas, in the south to Great Bend, Kansas, in the north. A semi-sedentary people, they occupied northern Texas in the early 18th century. They traded with other Southern Plains Indians on both sides of the Red River and south to Waco.
(Submitted on August 8, 2022, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.) 
 
The view of the Site of Waco Indian Village Marker behind the Taylor Museum from the street image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, August 4, 2022
3. The view of the Site of Waco Indian Village Marker behind the Taylor Museum from the street
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 8, 2022. It was originally submitted on August 8, 2022, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. This page has been viewed 283 times since then and 35 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on August 8, 2022, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.

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Mar. 2, 2024