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Waco in McLennan County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Evangelia Settlement

 
 
Evangelia Settlement Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, August 4, 2022
1. Evangelia Settlement Marker
Inscription.  The Evangelia Settlement was established as part of a larger progressive social movement from the late 1800s. This movement was bolstered by women in churches who started initiatives to help the less fortunate. Results included the founding of many settlement houses used as residences, education centers and child care facilities for families who needed to work during the day and could not afford these services.

In 1908, two Waco women, Ethel Dickson and Nell Symes, decided to start such a facility, naming it Evangelia Settlement. It was planned to offer religious and educational instruction. They began by renting a single room meant to support the children of those who worked at Slayden-Kirksey Woolen Mills. By 1920, they were able to move into a larger two-story building. Through the help of Waco's 'Community Chest' and other sources, they expanded to serve even more families. With these funds, the settlement built a brick cottage intended for infant care. In 1956, the YMCA, the Salvation Army and the Evangelia Settlement created a campaign called 'Yes for Youth' to raise funds for a new main building to replace the aging two-story
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house. The new building opened on July 13, 1958.

While the settlement shifted away from religious instruction, it continues to offer child care services, community outreach programs and other support services. The settlement partners with the USDA for lunch programs, Title XX for general funding and other nonprofit organizations for social outreach. The Evangelia Settlement continues to achieve its goal of providing care and support for families - a goal that began more than a century ago.
 
Erected 2019 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 22706.)
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Charity & Public WorkChurches & ReligionEducationWomen. A significant historical date for this entry is July 13, 1958.
 
Location. 31° 32.875′ N, 97° 8.041′ W. Marker is in Waco, Texas, in McLennan County. Marker is at the intersection of South 12th Street and Clay Avenue, on the left when traveling south on South 12th Street. The marker is located at the front of the Early Head Start Center on 12th Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 510 South 12th, Waco TX 76706, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Site of Old Texas Cotton Palace (about 800 feet away, measured in a direct line); First Presbyterian Church of Waco (approx. 0.3 miles away);
The Evangelia Settlement Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, August 4, 2022
2. The Evangelia Settlement Marker
Austin Avenue Methodist Church (approx. 0.3 miles away); Austin Avenue United Methodist Church (approx. 0.3 miles away); The Old Church (approx. 0.4 miles away); Silos Baking Co. (approx. 0.4 miles away); Stratton Stricker Building (approx. 0.4 miles away); St. Mary's Church of the Assumption (approx. half a mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Waco.
 
The view of the Evangelia Settlement Marker from across the street image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, August 4, 2022
3. The view of the Evangelia Settlement Marker from across the street
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 10, 2022. It was originally submitted on August 10, 2022, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. This page has been viewed 135 times since then and 29 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on August 10, 2022, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.

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Apr. 16, 2024