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Winchester in Frederick County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Huntsberry Farm

War in the Front Yard

— Third Battle of Winchester (September 19, 1864) —

 
 
Life on the Huntsberry Farm Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Jay Richardson, August 22, 2020
1. Life on the Huntsberry Farm Marker
Inscription.  (sidebar)
75 Yards in front of you stands the remnants of the Huntsberry Farm. At the time of the battle, the farm covered 400 acres north and south of Red Bud Run.

After emigrating from Germany in the early 1700's, the Huntsberry family first settled in Pennsylvania before relocating to the Shenandoah Valley—part of a wave of Germans and Scots-Irish immigrant families that moved to the Valley in search of opportunity in the mid-late 18th Century.

By 1860, the Huntsberry Farm (co-owned at the time by Jacob and Augustine Huntsberry) covered 400 acres. 17 people lived on the farm—9 family members and 8 enslaved African-Americans. The farm raised 1,500 bushels of oats, 250 bushels of wheat, 150 bushels of Irish potatoes, 120 bushels of rye, 100 pounds of wool, 624 pounds of butter, and 35 tons of hay. The farm produced 2 pounds of hops, 10 pounds of beeswax, and 100 pounds of honey. Livestock included 10 horses, 18 head of cattle, 37 sheep, and 30 swine.

In addition to the main house, the Huntsberry farmstead included orchards, a small domestic complex, agricultural outbuildings, and slave quarters.
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Several structures were located to the south of the main house, including the Hoffman tenant house.

During the Third Battle of Winchester, fighting raged across the farm. Unfortunately, no accounts of the family's experiences have been found.

The farm remained in the family until 2009 when it was purchased by the Shenandoah Valley Battlefields.

(sidebar)
Confederate Private Jacob A. Huntsberry
Jacob Augustine Huntsberry, the third son of Augustine Huntsberry, was born here in 1844. He enlisted in the Confederate army in 1861, at the age of 17, and served in the 12th Virginia Cavalry, which served as General Robert E. Lee's personal cavalry command.

(caption)
Part of the Huntsberry Farm, as seen on a historic map of the battle by G.L. Gillespie.

This sign made possible through funds donated by the Millbrook High School Cross Country Team
 
Erected 2020 by Shenandoah Valley Battlefields Foundation.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: War, US Civil. A significant historical date for this entry is September 19, 1864.
 
Location. 39° 12.292′ N, 78° 7.33′ W. Marker is in Winchester, Virginia, in Frederick County. Touch for map. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A Life In Bondage (within shouting distance of this marker); A Murderous Fire (within
Huntsberry Farm image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Jay Richardson, August 22, 2020
2. Huntsberry Farm
shouting distance of this marker); Southern Sharpshooters (approx. 0.2 miles away); Duval's Attack (approx. 0.2 miles away); Ohio (approx. ¼ mile away); Stuck In The Mud (approx. ¼ mile away); In Memory of Gilcin F. Meadors III (approx. 0.3 miles away); Sheridan Renews The Attack (approx. 0.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Winchester.
 
Remnants of the Huntsberry Farm image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Bradley Owen, October 17, 2020
3. Remnants of the Huntsberry Farm
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 19, 2022. It was originally submitted on September 5, 2020, by Jay Richardson of Martinsburg, West Virginia. This page has been viewed 402 times since then and 24 times this year. Last updated on August 18, 2022, by Craig Doda of Napoleon, Ohio. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on September 5, 2020, by Jay Richardson of Martinsburg, West Virginia.   3. submitted on October 26, 2020, by Bradley Owen of Morgantown, West Virginia. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.

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Feb. 25, 2024