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Luling in Caldwell County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Capitalizing on the Need for Feed

 
 
Capitalizing on the Need for Feed Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, August 21, 2022
1. Capitalizing on the Need for Feed Marker
Inscription.  With cotton declining in the 1920s, Charles, who bought out Herman's share in 1922, shifted focus to the next wave of agricultural enterprises - livestock. With cattle, dairy, poultry and swine came a need for feed, so Charles and his sons Paul and Charles David built a feed mill.

Captions
Lower Left: Charles carried a variety of feeds to serve the rapidly expanding poultry industry, including one he developed called "Henscratch" that was still being sold in the late 1950s.
Lower Middle: The discovery of oil hastened the demise of the cotton industry, but not the need for feed. Here a mule team hauls equipment to the Luling oil fields in the early 1920s.
Lower Right: Beef and barbeques were big, and so was the need for cattle feed.

 
Erected by Zedler Mill Museum and Park.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: AgricultureAnimalsIndustry & Commerce. A significant historical year for this entry is 1922.
 
Location. 29° 40.03′ N, 97° 39.061′ W. Marker
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is in Luling, Texas, in Caldwell County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of South Laurel Avenue and South Magnolia Street (State Highway 80). The marker is located in the central section of the Historic Zedler Mill Museum and Park. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1170 South Laurel Avenue, Luling TX 78648, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Same Old Grind (here, next to this marker); Responding to a Looming Need (within shouting distance of this marker); Going with the Grain (within shouting distance of this marker); Using Your 'Head' (within shouting distance of this marker); From Spin to Gin (within shouting distance of this marker); From Boll to Bolt (within shouting distance of this marker); Mixing to Match (within shouting distance of this marker); Zedler's Mills (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Luling.
 
More about this marker. The Zedler Mill Park and its parking are free to the public daily. Donations are appreciated when visiting the Zedler Mill Museum.
 
Also see . . .
1. Zedler Mill Museum & Park. The City of Luling, Texas
Over three generations the Zedler family continued to improve the cotton-grist-lumber mill factory. Steam engines, a concrete dam, mule barns, and a blacksmith
The Capitalizing on the Need for Feed Marker is on the right side of the two markers image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, August 21, 2022
2. The Capitalizing on the Need for Feed Marker is on the right side of the two markers
shop were added. In 1894, sons Herman and Carl Zedler installed a generator to supply the town of Luling with electric power and the mill remained the only power and water supplier for Luling until the 1920's. The grinding stones for the gristmill were replaced with more modern roller mills and the Zedlers added flour milling to the business along with animal sweet and chop feed products. In the 1950's they were still marketing a feed product called Henscratch and grinding fine cornmeal for Luling's dinner tables.
(Submitted on August 28, 2022, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.) 

2. Milling. Texas State Historical Association
Flour and grist milling was the first-ranking Texas industry until after the Civil War, and hundreds of mills of various capacities were scattered throughout the state. The old burr mill was gradually superseded by roller mills. In 1880 flouring, as it came to be called, and gristmill products again held first rank by value over all other Texas manufactured products. In 1890 flouring and gristmill products had dropped to second place, and in 1900 to third. From 1910 to 1940 they consistently held fourth place, while both quantity and value of the products increased with the introduction of modern methods and equipment. The total value of the products of sixty-seven
The Corn Sheller image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, August 21, 2022
3. The Corn Sheller
mills in 1940 was more than $12 million. By 1950 the Texas milling industry was conducted largely by big corporations, and custom milling had become a thing of the past.
(Submitted on August 28, 2022, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.) 
 
The markers in front of the Corn Sheller image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, August 21, 2022
4. The markers in front of the Corn Sheller
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 29, 2022. It was originally submitted on August 27, 2022, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. This page has been viewed 77 times since then and 16 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on August 28, 2022, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.   2, 3, 4. submitted on August 29, 2022, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.

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Jun. 21, 2024