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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Finleyville in Washington County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Headstones of American History - The Whiskey Rebellion

 
 
Headstones of American History - The Whiskey Rebellion Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Bradley Owen, September 3, 2022
1. Headstones of American History - The Whiskey Rebellion Marker
Inscription.  
The Whiskey Rebellion was a tax protest beginning in 1791 during the presidency of George Washington. The Mingo Creek Society, also known as the Whiskey Boys, was especially outraged at a federal tax levied on each gallon of whiskey they produced and each whiskey still. The tax money was needed to repay debts accumulated by the states during the Revolutionary War.

Location of rebel graves:

1. John Holcroft was an active insurgent who used the name "Tom the Tinker" to threaten farmers who complied with the tax.
2. Reverend Ralston was the first pastor of Mingo Creek Presbyterian Church. The rebels met at the Mingo Creek Meeting House to discuss the tax and plan their strategy.
3. John Hamilton, Colonel of the Mingo Creek Militia and Sheriff of Washington County, was accused of helping rioters burn the Neville home at Bower Hill. He and other prisoners were marched by foot to Philadelphia for trial, where he was aquitted.
4. Major James McFarlane led hundreds of militiamen to Bower Hill to force the local tax collector to resign. McFarlane was killed in an exchange
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of gunfire.
5. David Hamilton offered the excise officers his hospitality and drinks of whiskey with Jamaica ginger when they came to seize his still. After the officers fell into a sound sleep, Hamilton and his neighbors rushed the still and whiskey to a place of safety. The area is known as Ginger Hill today.
6. John Gaston, a Revolutionary War Veteran, delivered "Tom the Tinker" letters to the Pittsburgh "Gazette" to be published for all to read and be forewarned.

The Constitution of the United States Government and the power of the Presidency survived the challenge of the Whiskey Boys of Southwestern Pennsylvania. President Washington proclaimed a day of "Public Thanksgiving and Prayer" for February 19, 1795, following the defeat of the Whiskey Rebellion.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Cemeteries & Burial SitesNotable Events. In addition, it is included in the Whiskey Rebellion series list. A significant historical year for this entry is 1791.
 
Location. 40° 13.795′ N, 79° 59.768′ W. Marker is near Finleyville, Pennsylvania, in Washington County. Marker is on Mingo Church Road west of Pennsylvania Route 88, on the left when traveling west. Marker is located at Mingo Cemetery in the parking area across the road from Mingo Creek Presbyterian Church.
Headstones of American History - The Whiskey Rebellion Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Bradley Owen, September 3, 2022
2. Headstones of American History - The Whiskey Rebellion Marker
Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 561 Mingo Church Road, Finleyville PA 15332, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Revolutionary War Soldiers (here, next to this marker); Mingo Creek Church (within shouting distance of this marker); "Mingo Creek Meeting House" (within shouting distance of this marker); Rev. Saml. Ralston D.D. (within shouting distance of this marker); Captain James McFarlane (within shouting distance of this marker); Old Oak Tree Statue (within shouting distance of this marker); Cincinnati Mine Disaster (approx. ¼ mile away); Honor Roll (approx. 1.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Finleyville.
 
Grave of Reverend Ralston image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Bradley Owen, September 3, 2022
3. Grave of Reverend Ralston
Grave of Major James McFarlane image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Bradley Owen, September 3, 2022
4. Grave of Major James McFarlane
Grave of David Hamilton image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Bradley Owen, September 3, 2022
5. Grave of David Hamilton
Grave of John Gaston image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Bradley Owen, September 3, 2022
6. Grave of John Gaston
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 10, 2022. It was originally submitted on September 4, 2022, by Bradley Owen of Morgantown, West Virginia. This page has been viewed 401 times since then and 99 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on September 8, 2022, by Bradley Owen of Morgantown, West Virginia. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.

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Apr. 25, 2024