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Franklin in Williamson County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

Duck River Ridge Smarden and Mobley's Cut / Duck River Ridge and The Treaties of Hopewell

 
 
Duck River Ridge Smarden and Mobley's Cut Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Darren Jefferson Clay, September 5, 2022
1. Duck River Ridge Smarden and Mobley's Cut Marker
Inscription.  
Duck River Ridge Smarden and Mobley's Cut
During the 20 years that the top of this ridge was the boundary of the U. S., the Chickasaw, by treaty dated October 24, 1801, granted the U. S. the right to build a wagon road through Chickasaw territory to Natchez, MS, making the original entry point of the Natchez Trace into Chickasaw territory near this location. Smarden Post Office (1903-06) was located west of here in Jim Carlisle's store on Old Natchez Trace Rd. A steam shovel operator named Mobley gave his name to a geographic location known as Mobley's Cut when the Middle Tennessee Railroad crossed this ridge in 1909. Area families were Davis, Beard, Holt, Walls, Skelley, Parham, Sudberry, Carlisle, Lynn, Griggs, McCandless, Fox. Smith, Johnson. Goodgine. Turman, and Hargrove.

Duck River Ridge and The Treaties of Hopewell
The Treaties of Hopewell established the boundary between the U. S. and the native peoples as the ridge that divides the waters running into the Cumberland from those running into the Tennessee. In two separate treaties. each signed in Hopewell, SC.
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and each known as the Treaty of Hopewell. the Cherokee, on November 28, 1785, and the Chickasaw, on January 10. 1786. ceded the land north of this ridge to the U.S. Today, this ridge is known as the Duck River Ridge. In this location, the top of this ridge runs roughly along the same path as Natchez Trace Road. The boundary remained along the top of this ridge until 1805 when on October 25, the Cherokee and on July 23. the Chickasaw signed new treaties moving the boundary further south.
 
Erected 2005 by Williamson County Historical Society.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Native AmericansRailroads & Streetcars. A significant historical date for this entry is January 10, 1786.
 
Location. 35° 49.624′ N, 87° 3.674′ W. Marker is in Franklin, Tennessee, in Williamson County. Marker is on Hopewell Ridge Lane, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 5700 Hopewell Ridge Ln, Franklin TN 37064, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 5 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Tennessee Valley Divide (approx. 0.6 miles away); Boston (approx. 1.7 miles away); U.S.D. 1812 (approx. 2.4 miles away); Bending Chestnut (approx. 2.6 miles away); Garrison (approx. 3.2 miles away); Richard "Dick" Poyner
Duck River Ridge and The Treaties of Hopewell Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Darren Jefferson Clay, September 5, 2022
2. Duck River Ridge and The Treaties of Hopewell Marker
(approx. 3.7 miles away); Burwood (approx. 4˝ miles away); Dr. George B. Hunter Farm / Along Leiper's Fork (approx. 4.7 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Franklin.
 
Duck River Ridge Smarden and Mobley's Cut/Duck River Ridge and The Treaties of Hopewell Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Darren Jefferson Clay, September 5, 2022
3. Duck River Ridge Smarden and Mobley's Cut/Duck River Ridge and The Treaties of Hopewell Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 10, 2022. It was originally submitted on September 5, 2022, by Darren Jefferson Clay of Duluth, Georgia. This page has been viewed 307 times since then and 166 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on September 8, 2022, by Darren Jefferson Clay of Duluth, Georgia. • Mark Hilton was the editor who published this page.

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Jul. 22, 2024