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Pontiac in Oakland County, Michigan — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

One Person — One Vote

Michigan Legal Milestone

 
 
One Person — One Vote Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Cosmos Mariner, September 10, 2022
1. One Person — One Vote Marker
Inscription.  
August “Gus” Scholle then president of the Michigan AFL-CIO, was troubled by the fact that his Oakland County State Senate District in 1958 held more than 12 times the number of persons than an outstate district — yet each district elected one senator, meaning his vote was worth less, proportionately, than that of a voter in the outstate district. Other district disparities were almost as great, giving rural areas disproportionate influence in the Legislature.

In 1959 Scholle filed a novel and historic lawsuit, contending that such disparities violated the U.S. Constitution’s 14th Amendment Equal Protection Clause, which he believed affirms the right of each citizen to substantially equal voting power. Although the Michigan Supreme Court denied relief in 1960, the court later ruled favorably to Scholle’s position in 1962 and again in 1964, after U.S. Supreme Court remands following that Court’s decisions in cases arising in Tennessee and Alabama.

The Scholle case played a leading role in creating the legal principle that state legislative districts must be apportioned on a “one person — one vote” basis.
 
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1990 by The State Bar of Michigan and The Oakland County Bar Association. (Marker Number 12.)
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Civil RightsGovernment & PoliticsLabor Unions. In addition, it is included in the Michigan Legal Milestones series list. A significant historical year for this entry is 1959.
 
Location. 42° 39.322′ N, 83° 19.598′ W. Marker is in Pontiac, Michigan, in Oakland County. Marker is on Court Tower Boulevard, 0.1 miles west of County Center Drive East, on the right when traveling west. Marker is located beside the walkway, near the Oakland County Courthouse south entrance. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1200 Court Tower Boulevard, Pontiac MI 48341, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. The Courthouse / Oakland County (here, next to this marker); Oakland County World War I Memorial (here, next to this marker); Michigan's Auto Industry (a few steps from this marker); Helena Sexauer Memorial Planting (within shouting distance of this marker); Votes For Women (within shouting distance of this marker); Oakland County Fallen Heroes Memorial (approx. half a mile away); 911 Memorial...Never Forget (approx. half a mile away); Wisner Stadium WWII Memorial (approx. 1.1 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Pontiac.
One Person — One Vote Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Cosmos Mariner, September 10, 2022
2. One Person — One Vote Marker
(looking west • Oakland County Board of Commissioners Auditorium in background)

 
Also see . . .
1. One Man — One Vote.
In the United States, the "one person, one vote" principle was invoked in a series of cases by the Warren Court in the 1960s during the height of related civil rights activities. Applying the Equal Protection Clause of the constitution, the U.S. Supreme Court majority opinion (5–4) led by Chief Justice Earl Warren in Reynolds v. Sims (1964) ruled that state legislatures, unlike the U.S. Congress, needed to have representation in both houses that was based on districts containing roughly equal populations, with redistricting as needed after censuses. Some had an upper house based on an equal number of representatives to be elected from each county, which gave undue political power to rural counties.
(Submitted on September 10, 2022, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. One Person — One Vote.
Scholle v. Hare (1960, Michigan Supreme Court)
Scholle v. Hare (1962, U.S. Supreme Court)
Scholle v. Hare (1962, Michigan Supreme Court)
(Submitted on September 10, 2022, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
One Person — One Vote Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Cosmos Mariner, September 10, 2022
3. One Person — One Vote Marker
(looking north • Oakland County Courthouse in background)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 10, 2022. It was originally submitted on September 10, 2022, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 93 times since then and 5 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on September 10, 2022, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.

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Apr. 13, 2024