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Marmet in Kanawha County, West Virginia — The American South (Appalachia)
 

Courage in the Hollers

Mapping the Miners' Struggle for a Union

— A Project of the West Virginia Mine Wars Museum —

 
 
Courage in the Hollers Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Shaun Slifer, September 28, 2022
1. Courage in the Hollers Marker
This marker pins Marmet on a map of the entire route that led to the battlefield in 1921, and includes railroads and a nearby modern highway.
Inscription.  
For a century, the West Virginia Mine Wars and the Battle of Blair Mountain were kept out of history textbooks for fear of tarnishing the state’s image. But today, these events evoke fascination and pride for many Mountaineers and people across the US. The symbol of the red bandana has assumed new significance as scholars, teachers, and Americans of all backgrounds engage with the history-making fight West Virginia’s coal miners waged for their constitutional rights.

Courage in the Hollers is a community-driven project that memorializes this struggle on the soil where it happened. To learn more, visit wvminewars.org/courage

Marmet is located within the traditional homelands of many sovereign Indigenous nations. The Osage (𐓏𐒰𐓓𐒰𐓓𐒷), Cherokee (ᎠᏂᏴᏫᏯᎢ), Shawnee (Shawandasse Tula), Yuchi (Tsoyaha), Tutelo (Yesan), and Moneton are the original stewards of this place.

The Kanawha River knows many people of resistance. We acknowledge the role that colonization plays in the exploitation of home and labor. Indigenous access to this land
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and its care is disconnected, but not disinherited.
 
Erected 2022 by West Virginia Mine Wars Museum.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Labor UnionsNative AmericansSettlements & Settlers. A significant historical date for this entry is September 25, 1921.
 
Location. 38° 15.05′ N, 81° 34.283′ W. Marker is in Marmet, West Virginia, in Kanawha County. Marker is at the intersection of McCorkle Avenue and 86th Street, on the right when traveling south on McCorkle Avenue. There are three markers and one sculptural monument at this location, in front of the George Buckley Community Center (Marmet Rec Center). Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 8601 McCorkle Ave, Charleston WV 25315, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Battle of Blair Mountain (here, next to this marker); Marmet (here, next to this marker); Camp Piatt (approx. half a mile away); Corporal Victor Theodore Lake Jr. (approx. 0.7 miles away); Captain Larry F. Lucas (approx. 0.7 miles away); Veterans Memorial (approx. 0.7 miles away); Marmet Veteran's Tribute (approx. 0.7 miles away); World War II Memorial (approx. 0.7 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Marmet.
 
Also see . . .  Courage in the Hollers. Learn more about this initiative
Courage in the Hollers Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Dylan Vidovich, September 5, 2022
2. Courage in the Hollers Marker
to install markers and monuments along the route that led to the 1921 Battle of Blair Mountain. (Submitted on September 28, 2022, by Shaun Slifer of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.) 
 
Monument to the March that led to the Battle of Blair Mountain. image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Dylan Vidovich, September 5, 2022
3. Monument to the March that led to the Battle of Blair Mountain.
Mother Jones, part of monument to the March that led to the Battle of Blair Mountain. image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Dylan Vidovich, September 5, 2022
4. Mother Jones, part of monument to the March that led to the Battle of Blair Mountain.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 29, 2022. It was originally submitted on September 28, 2022, by Shaun Slifer of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 110 times since then and 35 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on September 28, 2022, by Shaun Slifer of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. • Devry Becker Jones was the editor who published this page.

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Jun. 21, 2024