Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
New Braunfels in Comal County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Ferdinand Jacob Lindheimer

1801 - 1879

 
 
Ferdinand Jacob Lindheimer Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, November 9, 2022
1. Ferdinand Jacob Lindheimer Marker
Inscription.  Ferdinand Lindheimer arrived in Texas as it was becoming a republic. Later he played important roles in the developing New Braunfels community.

Lindheimer created the town's first botanical garden, served as superintendent of the county school and first justice of the peace. He was also editor and publisher of the Neu-Braunfelser Zeitung.

During the Civil War Lindheimer was the leading voice on politics and economics among German Texans. Today, Ferdinand Lindheimer is remembered as the Father of Texas Botany.

Photo used by permission of the Sophierburg Museum and Archive
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: CommunicationsHorticulture & ForestryImmigrationWar, Texas Independence.
 
Location. 29° 42.803′ N, 98° 6.601′ W. Marker is in New Braunfels, Texas, in Comal County. Marker is on Peace Avenue, 0.1 miles south of East Commerce Street, on the left when traveling south. The marker is located in the northwest section of the Comal German Cemetery.
Paid Advertisement
Click on the ad for more information.
Please report objectionable advertising to the Editor.
Click or scan to see
this page online
Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 301 Peace Avenue, New Braunfels TX 78130, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Ferdinand J. Lindheimer (here, next to this marker); Heinrich Mordhorst (within shouting distance of this marker); Welcome to the Comal Cemetery (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Notable People & Plots (about 300 feet away); Comal County Fair (approx. ¼ mile away); Church Hill School Building (approx. 0.8 miles away); Breustedt House (approx. 0.9 miles away); Site of an Early Mill and Factory (approx. 0.9 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in New Braunfels.
 
Also see . . .  Lindheimer, Ferdinand Jacob (1801–1879). Texas State Historical Association
Ferdinand Jacob Lindheimer, naturalist and newspaper editor, was born on May 21, 1801, in Frankfurt am Main, Germany, the youngest son of Johann Hartmann and Jahnette Magdeline (Reisser) Lindheimer. His father was an affluent merchant. Lindheimer is often called the father of Texas botany because of his work as the first permanent-resident plant collector in Texas. He received his education at the Frankfurt Gymnasium and attended a preparatory school in Berlin. He attended the University of Wiesbaden, the University
The Ferdinand Jacob Lindheimer Marker in front of the THC marker at his gravesite image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, November 9, 2022
2. The Ferdinand Jacob Lindheimer Marker in front of the THC marker at his gravesite
of Jena, and the University of Bonn, where he won a scholarship in philology. He returned to Frankfurt and became a teacher at the Bunsen Institute in the fall of 1827. There he became active in the political movement agitating for reform of the German government. In 1834 Lindheimer, whose political affiliations had alienated his family and placed him at risk, immigrated to the United States as a political refugee.
(Submitted on November 10, 2022, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.) 
 
The view of the two markers in the cemetery image. Click for full size.
Photographed By James Hulse, November 9, 2022
3. The view of the two markers in the cemetery
On the left side within the fenced area.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 10, 2022. It was originally submitted on November 10, 2022, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. This page has been viewed 131 times since then and 26 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on November 10, 2022, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.

Share this page.  
Share on Tumblr
m=210029

CeraNet Cloud Computing sponsors the Historical Marker Database.
This website earns income from purchases you make after using our links to Amazon.com. We appreciate your support.
Paid Advertisement
May. 28, 2024