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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Prospect Park in Delaware County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Even History Changes

 
 
Even History Changes Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Devry Becker Jones (CC0), November 18, 2022
1. Even History Changes Marker
Inscription.  
The Morton Homestead was completely dismantled during restoration.

The Homestead was first identified as an historic site in 1862. Later it was believed to be the birthplace of John Morton, a signer of the Declaration of Independence. In 1957, after extensive research, the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission was "reluctantly forced to conclude that the birth of John Morton at the Morton Homestead has not been proved." The findings raised a storm of local controversy. The State of Pennsylvania renamed the site Morton Homestead. It was considered a fine example of Swedish colonial log architecture.

In 1988, the research continued. The property was jointly owned by Morton Mortonson, great-grandfather of the signer John Morton, and Jan Cornelius. However, maps of the time seem to show that only Jan Cornelius occupied the Homestead. Researchers also came to doubt that the architecture of the building was purely Swedish. It included some double notched Atlantic White Cedar logs characteristic of Scandinavia. But the floor plan and other logs of White Oak were typically English. Perhaps it is one of
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the first truly American buildings, a practical blend of techniques and materials from many sources.

When?
Before 1638: Indians
1638 - 1655: New Sweden
1655 - 1664: Dutch dominion
1664 - 1681: English rule
1681 - 1784: Pennsylvania colony
1784 - 1870: Americans
1870 - 1935: Suburban development
1935 - 1937: Building restoration
1937 - present: Historic park

 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Anthropology & ArchaeologyArchitectureColonial EraSettlements & SettlersWar, US Revolutionary. In addition, it is included in the Signers of the Declaration of Independence series list. A significant historical year for this entry is 1862.
 
Location. 39° 52.613′ N, 75° 18.311′ W. Marker is in Prospect Park, Pennsylvania, in Delaware County. Marker is on Wanamaker Avenue (Pennsylvania Route 420) 0.2 miles south of Lafayette Avenue, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 100 Lincoln Ave, Prospect Park PA 19076, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Ferry Landing (within shouting distance of this marker); Morton Homestead (within shouting distance of this marker); The First Building (within shouting distance of
Even History Changes Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Devry Becker Jones (CC0), November 18, 2022
2. Even History Changes Marker
this marker); The Second Building (within shouting distance of this marker); Darby Creek Then and Now (within shouting distance of this marker); A Morton Mystery (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Morton Homestead (within shouting distance of this marker); Welcome to The Morton Homestead (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Prospect Park.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 20, 2022. It was originally submitted on November 20, 2022, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. This page has been viewed 97 times since then and 17 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on November 20, 2022, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia.

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May. 27, 2024