Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Dover in Stewart County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

Advance on Fort Donelson

Feb. 11-12, 1862

 
 
Advance on Fort Donelson Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Tom Bosse
1. Advance on Fort Donelson Marker
Inscription.  Here was formerly a road following a telegraph line between Dover and Tennessee River. Following Ft. Henry’s capture, Grant’s Army of the Ohio marched on Ft. Donelson in two columns, the northernmost on this road. Leading in battle formation was the 2nd Brig. 1st Div. Col. W.H L. Wallace. Units of the 2nd Div., Brig. Gen. C. F. Smith, followed in march column.
 
Erected by Tennessee Historical Commission. (Marker Number 3C 32.)
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: War, US Civil. In addition, it is included in the Tennessee Historical Commission series list. A significant historical date for this entry is February 11, 1862.
 
Location. 36° 30.281′ N, 87° 54.695′ W. Marker is near Dover, Tennessee, in Stewart County. Marker is at the intersection of Woodlands Trace Road (Tennessee Route 49) and Boyd Road, on the left when traveling north on Woodlands Trace Road. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Dover TN 37058, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Brigadier General Charles F. Smith’s Division (approx. 2.2 miles away); Brigadier General John A. McClernand’s Division
Paid Advertisement
Click on the ad for more information.
Please report objectionable advertising to the Editor.
Click or scan to see
this page online
(approx. 2.3 miles away); U.S.A. Headquarters of Brigadier General U.S. Grant (approx. 2.4 miles away); Jackson's Virginia Battery (approx. 2.8 miles away); Seizing the Initiative (approx. 2.8 miles away); Lauman's Brigade (approx. 2.9 miles away); Union Camp (approx. 2.9 miles away); Fort Donelson Confederate Monument (approx. 3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Dover.
 
Also see . . .  Fort Donelson National Battlefield. National Park website. (Submitted on August 1, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of Woodland Park, New Jersey.) 
 
Advance on Fort Donelson Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Shane Oliver, March 6, 2021
2. Advance on Fort Donelson Marker
Advance on Fort Donelson Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Bill Coughlin, July 28, 2003
3. Advance on Fort Donelson Marker
Advance on Fort Donelson Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Tom Bosse, July 4, 2019
4. Advance on Fort Donelson Marker
Advance on Fort Donelson Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Darren Jefferson Clay, April 3, 2021
5. Advance on Fort Donelson Marker
Fort Donelson National Battlefield image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Bill Coughlin, July 28, 2003
6. Fort Donelson National Battlefield
The marker is located west of the site of the February 1862 Battle of Fort Donelson.
Fort Donelson Artillery image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Bill Coughlin, July 28, 2003
7. Fort Donelson Artillery
Grant's troops successfully attacked the works of Fort Donelson on February 13 thru 15, 1862.
Fort Donelson River Battery image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Bill Coughlin, July 28, 2003
8. Fort Donelson River Battery
This battery on the Cumberland River was the site of the February 14, 1862 battle in which Confederate troops defeated a Union flotilla of wooden and ironclad gunboats.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on May 11, 2021. It was originally submitted on August 1, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of Woodland Park, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 1,315 times since then and 18 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on July 16, 2019, by Tom Bosse of Jefferson City, Tennessee.   2. submitted on May 10, 2021, by Shane Oliver of Richmond, Virginia.   3. submitted on August 1, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of Woodland Park, New Jersey.   4. submitted on July 16, 2019, by Tom Bosse of Jefferson City, Tennessee.   5. submitted on April 4, 2021, by Darren Jefferson Clay of Duluth, Georgia.   6, 7, 8. submitted on August 1, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of Woodland Park, New Jersey.

Share this page.  
Share on Tumblr
m=21295

CeraNet Cloud Computing sponsors the Historical Marker Database.
This website earns income from purchases you make after using our links to Amazon.com. We appreciate your support.
Paid Advertisement
Apr. 20, 2024