Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Shiloh in Hardin County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

Surrender of the Hornets' Nest

 
 
Surrender of the Hornets' Nest Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Swain, March 16, 2009
1. Surrender of the Hornets' Nest Marker
Inscription.  
In the woods to the right and behind you lay the heart of the Hornets' Nest, where Union infantry and artillery held out eight hours against the Confederate tide. The Federals repulsed a series of assaults across Duncan Field (ahead) and through the adjoining woods.

Late in the day, 62 cannon commanded by Brig. Gen. Daniel Ruggles began pounding the Hornets' Nest from across the field, while Confederate infantry pressed in on the flanks. Many Federals escaped the closing trap, but more than 2,000 men under Brig. Gen. Benjamin M. Prentiss held their ground. Isolated and outnumbered, the Union defenders surrendered.

The Confederates crushed the Hornets' Nest, but the effort cost them many lives, and allowed General Grant time to consolidate his forces for a successful counterattack the next day.
 
Erected by National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: War, US Civil. In addition, it is included in the Former U.S. Presidents: #18 Ulysses S. Grant series list.
 
Location.
Paid Advertisement
Click on the ad for more information.
Please report objectionable advertising to the Editor.
Click or scan to see
this page online
35° 8.156′ N, 88° 20.282′ W. Marker is near Shiloh, Tennessee, in Hardin County. Marker is at the intersection of Eastern Corinth Road and Hornets Nest Loop, on the right when traveling south on Eastern Corinth Road. Located near the intersection of the "Sunken Road" and the Eastern Corinth Road in Shiloh National Military Park. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Shiloh TN 38376, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. First Minnesota Light Artillery (a few steps from this marker); "Hornets Nest" (within shouting distance of this marker); 12th Iowa Infantry Regiment (within shouting distance of this marker); Impenetrable Thicket (within shouting distance of this marker); 14th Iowa Infantry Regiment (within shouting distance of this marker); Arkansas Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); Munch's Battery (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); 21st Missouri Infantry (about 300 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Shiloh.
 
More about this marker. In the center is a copy of the painting Battle of Shiloh drawn by Thure de Thulstrup, depicting action in the Hornets' Nest. Union soldiers in the Hornets' Nest successfully defended their position along the "Sunken Road" until late in the day.

In the right center is a portrait of Prentiss.
Battle Map - April 6, 1862 image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Swain, March 16, 2009
2. Battle Map - April 6, 1862
The north seeking arrow points to the right of the map.
Brig. Gen. Benjamin M. Prentiss commanded the Sixth Division of the Union Army of the Tennessee at Shiloh. After his capture here, Prentiss was held prisoner of war for six months.

On the far right is a map depicting the action at this phase of the battle, titled The Hornets' Nest - April 6, 1862 - p.m. and captioned, Confederate flanking movements on the afternoon of April 6 led to the isolation and surrender of the Hornets' Nest.

At the top of the marker is a timeline showing the span of the battle, with time of the Union surrender at the Hornet's Nest indicated.
 
Surrender of the Hornets' Nest Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Swain, March 16, 2009
3. Surrender of the Hornets' Nest Marker
The trace of the "Sunken Road" passes beside the marker, and several regimental monuments are seen to the right. Duncan Field lies in the background to the south. In the far woodline is the location of Ruggles' massed batteries.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 2, 2020. It was originally submitted on September 27, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,729 times since then and 24 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on September 27, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.

Share this page.  
Share on Tumblr
m=22774

CeraNet Cloud Computing sponsors the Historical Marker Database.
U.S. FTC REQUIRED NOTICE: This website earns income from purchases you make after using links to Amazon.com. Thank you.
Paid Advertisements
Feb. 29, 2024