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Cainhoy in Berkeley County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

St. Thomas Church

 
 
St. Thomas Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2009
1. St. Thomas Church Marker
Inscription.  The Parish of St. Thomas was established by Act of Assembly Nov. 30, 1706. The first church was erected in 1708 and destroyed by forest fire in 1815. The present ediface was erected in 1819. (Marker Number 8-13.)
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Churches & ReligionColonial Era.
 
Location. 32° 57.66′ N, 79° 51.403′ W. Marker is in Cainhoy, South Carolina, in Berkeley County. Marker is on Cainhoy Road (State Highway 8-98). Located North of Brick Church Road. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Huger SC 29450, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 8 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Brabant Plantation (approx. 4.1 miles away); Thomas Lynch at Rivertowne (approx. 4.6 miles away); Otranto Indigo Vat (approx. 4.7 miles away); Wando Pottery (approx. 5 miles away); Point Plantation / Richmond Plantation (approx. 5.4 miles away); Phillips Community (approx. 6.1 miles away); Brickyard Plantation (approx. 7.9 miles away); Sweetgrass Baskets (approx. 8 miles away).
 
Regarding St. Thomas Church.
St. Thomas Church Marker, as seen along Cainhoy Road (State Road 8-98) image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, September 26, 2009
2. St. Thomas Church Marker, as seen along Cainhoy Road (State Road 8-98)
(St. Thomas & St. Dennis Parish Episcopal Church; Brick Church) White Church, or St. Thomas & St. Dennis Parish Episcopal Church, was constructed in 1819 and occupies the site of the older parish church of St. Thomas, which was built about 1706 but which burned in 1815. During the Reconstruction period, the church was the scene of the 1876 “Cainhoy Massacre,” a serious riot between whites and blacks which developed when some white men from Charleston journeyed to Cainhoy to attend a Negro Republican meeting. The blacks fired upon the white men with guns they had hidden in a vault at St. Thomas churchyard.
The church, charming in its simplicity of design, is a uniquely beautiful example of a small, rural parish church of the early 1800s. The church, with its Classical Revival or late Federal features, is made of stucco over brick with a medium gable roof made of tile. A high-arched doorway with a fanlight capped by a five-panel arch is set between pilasters. The side facades are identical. A balcony above the inside door was added about 1858. In 1937 the church was restored by Henry F. Guggenheim. An unusual and distinctive auxiliary building is the vestry, with hipped roof on one end and chimney on the other, giving the appearance of a half-completed building. A cemetery dating from 1782 is included in the nomination. Listed in the National Register September 22,
St. Thomas Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, September 26, 2009
3. St. Thomas Church Marker
1977. ( S.C. Dept. Of Archives and History )
 
Also see . . .  Touring South Carolina's Revolutionary War Sites By Daniel W. Barefoot, page 39. Richard Fordham grave (here) notes he served aboard frigate Randolph during the Revolution (Submitted on October 17, 2009, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. Cross inside the church
I went out to St. Thomas Chapel of Ease several times in the early 1990's. The caretaker, John Slayton, was a friend and fellow member of St. Andrews Church, Mount Pleasant, SC. John made the large cross that is hanging over the altar at St. Thomas Chapel. He also made another large cross for St. Andrews and hung it in the old Sams Hall.
    — Submitted June 27, 2018, by Ann Sullivan Tiller of Mount Pleasant, South Carolina.
 
St. Thomas Church front image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, September 26, 2009
4. St. Thomas Church front
St. Thomas Church, rear image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, September 26, 2009
5. St. Thomas Church, rear
St. Thomas Church south view image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, September 26, 2009
6. St. Thomas Church south view
St. Thomas Church image. Click for full size.
S.C. Dept. Of Archives and History, circa 1972
7. St. Thomas Church
St. Thomas Church Vestry image. Click for full size.
S.C. Dept. Of Archives and History, circa 1972
8. St. Thomas Church Vestry
St. Thomas Church image. Click for full size.
S.C. Dept. Of Archives and History, circa 1972
9. St. Thomas Church
National Register of Historical Places : White Church (added 1972 - Building - #72001193) • Also known as The Brick Church;St. Thomas Episcopal Church • 2 mi. N of Cainhoy on SR 8-98, Cainhoy • Historic Significance: Event, Architecture/Engineering • Architect, builder, or engineer: Unknown • Architectural Style: No Style Listed • Area of Significance: Religion, Politics/Government, Architecture • Period of Significance: 1800-1824 • Owner: Private • Historic Function: Funerary, Religion • Historic Sub-function: Cemetery, Religious Structure • Current Function: Funerary, Religion • Current Sub-function: Cemetery, Religious Structure •
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 3, 2019. It was originally submitted on October 17, 2009, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 3,493 times since then and 24 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9. submitted on October 17, 2009, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page.
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Jan. 19, 2021