Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Parsons in Tucker County, West Virginia — The American South (Appalachia)
 

Corricks Ford Battlefield

Death of a General and Birth of a State

 
 
Corricks Ford Battlefield Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, July 17, 2020
1. Corricks Ford Battlefield Marker
Inscription.  
"They have not given me an adequate force. I can do nothing. They have sent me to my death."
Gen. Robert S. Garnet CSA

"I have made a very clean sweep of it."
Maj. Gen. George B. McClellan USA

Confederate Gen. Robert S. Garnett took command of the Army of the Northwest in this region after the "Philippi Races," first land battle of the Civil War. By June 16, 1861, Garnett's 5,300 Confederates dug in at Rich Mountain and Laurel Hill, more than 25 miles south, to stop an invasion by Union Gen. George McClellan.

McClellan's victory at Rich Mountain on July 11 forced Gen. Garnett to abandon Laurel Hill. That night, Garnett and 3,500 Confederates marched south toward Beverly. Fearing a trap, they turned northeast in a daring bid to escape.

Union Gen. Thomas Morris' brigade gave chase. Slowed by muddy roads and river crossings, Gen. Garnett's army made a gallant stand to rescue their wagons less than on mile south on Shavers Fork.

Breaking off the fight, they retreated downstream to nearby Corricks Ford, where Garnett was killed on July 13, 1861 - the first Civil War general to
Corricks Ford Battlefield Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, October 11, 2009
2. Corricks Ford Battlefield Marker
A West Virginia Civil War Trails marker has since been installed adjacent to the sign.
fall. His Confederates fled in disarray to Highland County, Virginia. Events here made Gen. McClellan a national hero and bolstered West Virginia statehood in 1863.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: War, US Civil. In addition, it is included in the Battlefield Trails - Civil War series list.
 
Location. 39° 5.391′ N, 79° 40.832′ W. Marker is in Parsons, West Virginia, in Tucker County. Marker is on Poplar Street, on the right when traveling south. Located in the parking area for the Corricks Ford Battlefield Park. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Parsons WV 26287, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Clash at Corricks Ford (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Corrick House (approx. 0.2 miles away); Corricks Ford (approx. 0.2 miles away); a different marker also named Corricks Ford Battlefield (approx. ¼ mile away); This Stone Commemorates the Battle of Corricks Ford (approx. ¼ mile away); a different marker also named Corrick's Ford (approx. ¼ mile away); a different marker also named Corricks Ford Battlefield (approx. ¼ mile away); Historic Western Maryland Railway Depot / Parsons Railroad Depot (approx. 0.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Parsons.
 
More about this marker. In the upper portion of the marker are portraits of Gen. Garnett and McClellan. Also in the upper center is a campaign map indicating the routes taken by the Confederates in retreat and the Federals in pursuit, bringing them to Corrick's Ford. In the lower portion of the marker is a map showing the key points in the battlefield park, titled Corricks Ford Battlefield Master Plan.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. Corricks Ford
Corricks Ford Battlefield Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, July 17, 2020
3. Corricks Ford Battlefield Marker
Battlefield
by Markers
 
Corricks Ford Battlefield Park image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, October 11, 2009
4. Corricks Ford Battlefield Park
The West Virginia Allegheny Highlands Trail passes through the battlefield park.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 18, 2020. It was originally submitted on October 26, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,935 times since then and 89 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on July 18, 2020, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia.   2. submitted on October 26, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   3. submitted on July 18, 2020, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia.   4. submitted on October 26, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.
Paid Advertisement
Oct. 21, 2020