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Calmoutier in Holmes County, Ohio — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Calmoutier

 
 
Calmoutier Marker (Side A) image. Click for full size.
Photographed By William Fischer, Jr., October 25, 2009
1. Calmoutier Marker (Side A)
Inscription.  
Side A:
This area, known as Calmoutier, was an early French Catholic farming community founded in 1832 by Claude Druhot, who came from Calmoutier, Hte-Saône, France. Its first native, the four-month-old Claude Joseph Druhot, was baptized on 9 June 1833 by Fr. John Henni, who resided at St. John's in Canton (and in 1854 became Milwaukee's first bishop). In 1836 Fr. John Alleman, O.P., established St. Genevieve's Mission (when it began to keep its own records) on land donated by the Pierson and Roussel families. The log chapel that was built (the first of four churches here) predated any Catholic church building in Cleveland, Akron, and Toledo.

Side B:
Fr. Stephen Badin, the first Catholic priest ordained in America (by Bishop John Carroll in 1793), frequented St. Genevieve's from 1835-1837. He was Missionary Apostolic and Pastor of the Potawatomi Indians, Vicar-General of Bardstown and Apostle of Kentucky, and Vicar-General of Cincinnati. In 1841 he deeded the site of Notre Dame University, where he is buried, to its founder Fr. Edward Sorin, C.S.C. But the most celebrated missionary, Fr. Jean Baptiste Lamy,
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came from Danville in nearby Knox County between 1839-1841. In 1853 he was made the first Bishop of Santa Fe, New Mexico. Portrayed as Bishop Latour in Willa Cather's fictionalized novel, Death Comes for the Archbishop, he is also the hero in Paul Horgan's historical work, Lamy of Santa Fe. The famous Kit Carson, a convert, esteemed him highly and scouted for him.
 
Erected 2003 by Calmoutier Memorial Association and The Ohio Historical Society. (Marker Number 2-38.)
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Arts, Letters, MusicCemeteries & Burial SitesChurches & ReligionNative AmericansSettlements & Settlers. In addition, it is included in the Ohio Historical Society / The Ohio History Connection series list. A significant historical date for this entry is June 9, 1833.
 
Location. 40° 39.958′ N, 81° 46.729′ W. Marker is in Calmoutier, Ohio, in Holmes County. Marker is on County Road 229, on the left when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 4527 County Road 229, Fredericksburg OH 44627, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 11 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Pvt. William J. Knight (approx. 6½ miles away); Sonnenberg Settlement 1819 (approx. 6½ miles away); Wilmot Civil War Memorial
Calmoutier Marker (Side B) image. Click for full size.
Photographed By William Fischer, Jr., October 25, 2009
2. Calmoutier Marker (Side B)
(approx. 7.4 miles away); Birthplace of William M. McCulloch (approx. 7.6 miles away); Jonas Stutzman (approx. 9.8 miles away); Peace Bridge (approx. 9.8 miles away); Millersburg Opera House (approx. 10.6 miles away); Veterans Memorial (approx. 10.6 miles away).
 
Additional commentary.
1.
My great grandfather Joseph Semonin came to Calmoutier Ohio in 1875 from Calmoutier France He lived with the Cholley family with whom he became very close. He was Paul Cholley’s best man at his wedding to Mary Guenther. He married Marie Jeanmougin in 1882. He owned and operated the general store in Maysville where 9 of his 12 children were born including my grandfather Lester P Semonin. He eventually settled in Akron Ohio And worked at Firestone Rubber Co. He died in 1928 and his wife died in 1933 My mother is Maryanne Semonin dauther of Lester and Elizabeth. Note To Editor only visible by Contributor and editor    
    — Submitted August 2, 2015, by William Beck of Cuyahogafalls, Ohio.
 
Calmoutier Marker and St. Genevieve Church image. Click for full size.
Photographed By William Fischer, Jr., October 25, 2009
3. Calmoutier Marker and St. Genevieve Church
Calmoutier Marker and St. Genevieve Church image. Click for full size.
Photographed By William Fischer, Jr., October 25, 2009
4. Calmoutier Marker and St. Genevieve Church
St. Genevieve Church 1836-1981 Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By William Fischer, Jr., October 25, 2009
5. St. Genevieve Church 1836-1981 Marker
Cemetery Sign image. Click for full size.
Photographed By William Fischer, Jr.
6. Cemetery Sign
St. Genevieve Church Cemetery image. Click for full size.
Photographed By William Fischer, Jr., October 25, 2009
7. St. Genevieve Church Cemetery
Eugenie Boigegrain Grave Marker in French image. Click for full size.
Photographed By William Fischer, Jr., October 25, 2009
8. Eugenie Boigegrain Grave Marker in French
Clarice Girard Grave Marker in French image. Click for full size.
Photographed By William Fischer, Jr., October 25, 2009
9. Clarice Girard Grave Marker in French
Marguerite Martin Grave Marker in French image. Click for full size.
Photographed By William Fischer, Jr., October 25, 2009
10. Marguerite Martin Grave Marker in French
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 2, 2019. It was originally submitted on November 14, 2009, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 3,225 times since then and 131 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10. submitted on November 14, 2009, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.

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Apr. 25, 2024