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Lexington in Oglethorpe County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Governor Gilmer’s Home

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Governor Gilmer’s Home Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By David Seibert, November 15, 2009
1. Governor Gilmer’s Home Marker
Inscription.  
George Rockingham Gilmer, of Scotch descent, was born in 1790 in that part of Wilkes Co. that is now Oglethorpe Co. Soon after admittance to the bar in 1813 he was appointed 1st Lt. in the regular army and served with distinction in the Creek Indian War. He was elected to the State Legislature in 1818, to Congress in 1821 and Governor in 1828, re-elected to Congress in 1833 and Governor in 1837. He was a Presidential Elector for Harrison in 1840 and President of the Electoral College. A Trustee of the Univ. of Ga. for 30 years he died here Nov. 15, 1859 and is buried in the Presbyterian Cemetery. The arrow points to his home.
 
Erected 1954 by Georgia Historical Commission. (Marker Number 109-3.)
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Cemeteries & Burial SitesEducationWars, US Indian. In addition, it is included in the Georgia Historical Society series list. A significant historical month for this entry is October 1850.
 
Location. 33° 52.17′ N, 83° 6.702′ W. Marker is in Lexington, Georgia, in Oglethorpe
The Oglethorpe County Courthouse image. Click for full size.
Photographed By David Seibert, November 15, 2009
2. The Oglethorpe County Courthouse
The Gilmer marker can just be seen at the far right of the photo
Click or scan to see
this page online
County. Marker is at the intersection of Main Street (U.S. 78) and Gilmer Street, on the right when traveling east on Main Street. The marker is located on the grounds of the Oglethorpe County Courthouse. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Lexington GA 30648, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Oglethorpe County Confederate Monument (here, next to this marker); Gen. James Edward Oglethorpe (within shouting distance of this marker); Oglethorpe County Veterans Monument (within shouting distance of this marker); Oglethorpe County (within shouting distance of this marker); James T. Rayle Post No. 123 Monument (within shouting distance of this marker); Historic Oglethorpe County Jail (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Beth-Salem Presbyterian Church (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Birthplace of Columbia Theological Seminary (approx. 0.2 miles away); Meson Academy (approx. 0.2 miles away); a different marker also named Meson Academy (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Lexington.
 
Regarding Governor Gilmer’s Home. George Gilmer's English/Irish family moved to the Wilkes County area of Georgia from Virginia, where the Gilmer name was well known. Dr. George Gilmer was Thomas Jefferson's personal physician.
The home is no longer standing.
 
Also see . . .
1. George R. Gilmer (1790-1859).
Governor Gilmer’s Home Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Brian Scott, October 4, 2015
3. Governor Gilmer’s Home Marker
New Georgia Encyclopedia website entry (Submitted on January 3, 2010, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia.) 

2. George Rockingham Gilmer (1790-1859). Wikipedia biography:
George Rockingham Gilmer (April 11, 1790 – November 16, 1859) was an American statesman and politician. He served two non-consecutive terms as the 34th Governor of Georgia, the first from 1829 to 1831 and the second from 1837 to 1839. He also served multiple terms in the United States House of Representatives. (Submitted on October 16, 2014, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

3. George Rockingham Gilmer (1790-1859). Find A Grave entry (Submitted on October 16, 2014, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

4. Creek War. Wikipedia entry:
The Creek War (1813–1814), also known as the Red Stick War and the Creek Civil War, was a regional war between opposing Creek factions, European empires, and the United States, taking place largely in Alabama and along the Gulf Coast. The major conflicts of the war took place between state militias and the "Red Stick" Creeks. (Submitted on October 16, 2014, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Governor George Rockingham Gilmer<br>1790-1859 image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Brian Scott
4. Governor George Rockingham Gilmer
1790-1859
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 25, 2021. It was originally submitted on December 31, 2009, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia. This page has been viewed 927 times since then and 6 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on December 31, 2009, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia.   3, 4. submitted on October 16, 2014, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.

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Jan. 30, 2023