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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
New York in New York County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

John Ericsson

 
 
John Ericsson Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 5, 2008
1. John Ericsson Marker
Inscription.  
The City of New York
erects this statue to the
memory of a citizen whose
genius has contributed
to the greatness of the
republic and the progress
of the world.
----------
April 26, 1893.
----------
On July 31, 1803, John Ericsson was
Born in Langsbanshytten, Sweden
Died in New York March 8, 1889

 
Erected 1893 by City of New York.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: War, US Civil. A significant historical month for this entry is March 1882.
 
Location. 40° 42.217′ N, 74° 0.872′ W. Marker is in New York, New York, in New York County. Marker can be reached from State Street, on the right when traveling south. Marker is located in the northeast part of Battery Park. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: New York NY 10004, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. John Ericsson Statue (here, next to this marker); This Ancient Cannon (within shouting distance of this marker); Fort George (within shouting distance of this marker); Wireless Operators Memorial (within shouting distance of this
Marker in Battery Park image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 5, 2008
2. Marker in Battery Park
Click or scan to see
this page online
marker); Netherlands Monument (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Netherlands Memorial (about 300 feet away); Historic Battery Park & Castle Clinton (about 300 feet away); American Merchant Marine (about 300 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in New York.
 
Related marker. Click here for another marker that is related to this marker. A marker for John Ericsson in Washington, D.C.
 
Also see . . .
1. The Battle of the Ironclads, 1862. EyeWitness to History.com website. (Submitted on November 25, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of Woodland Park, New Jersey.) 

2. The Battery: John Ericsson. The official Parks Department description of the monument. (Submitted on December 12, 2018, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York.) 

3. John Ericsson. Wikipedia biography. (Submitted on April 11, 2020, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York.) 
 
Closeup of John Ericsson Statue image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 5, 2008
3. Closeup of John Ericsson Statue
John Ericsson is seen here holding a model of the USS Monitor.
Front Relief image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 5, 2008
4. Front Relief
The front of the pedestal contains a relief of the frigate Princeton sailing in the Potomac River.
Right Relief image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 5, 2008
5. Right Relief
The right of the pedestal contains a relief of the USS Monitor in Hampton Roads, Va.
Rear Relief image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 5, 2008
6. Rear Relief
Left Relief image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 5, 2008
7. Left Relief
John Ericsson<br>1803–1889 image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, February 16, 2015
8. John Ericsson
1803–1889
This 1912 painting by Arvid Frederick Nyholm (after Mathew Brady) hangs in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington D.C.

“Before he came to the United States in 1839, the Swedish-born engineer and inventor John Ericsson revolutionized navigation with his development of the screw propeller, He achieved fame during the Civil War when he designed the ironclad warship Monitor, the federal response to the threat of the Confederate ironclad Virginia (the refitted USS Merrimac) , Ericsson, posing with a model of his ‘tin can on a raft,’ always worked alone and had previously perfected engines for many purposes, including fire engines and a steam locomotive. He later developed the forerunner of the modern naval destroyer. ” — National Portrait Gallery
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 23, 2021. It was originally submitted on November 25, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of Woodland Park, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 904 times since then and 10 times this year. Last updated on April 3, 2010, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on November 25, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of Woodland Park, New Jersey.   8. submitted on March 21, 2015, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page.

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Apr. 17, 2021