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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Charleston in Charleston County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Powder Magazine

 
 
Powder Magazine Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Swain, May 3, 2010
1. Powder Magazine Marker
Inscription.  Fort Sumter's powder was stored in these specially constructed rooms in the corner (angle) of the gorge wall. Protecting gunpowder was critical; the gorge, at the rear of the fort, was considered a safe location. But Fort Sumter was designed to face the sea, and was vulnerable to attack from the land. When Confederate batteries bombarded the fort in April 1861, the resulting fire threatened the magazine, causing Major Robert Anderson to surrender rather than endanger his men.
 
Erected by Fort Sumter National Monument, South Carolina - National Park Service - U.S. Department of the Interior.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Forts and CastlesWar, US Civil. A significant historical month for this entry is April 1861.
 
Location. 32° 45.14′ N, 79° 52.512′ W. Marker is near Charleston, South Carolina, in Charleston County. Marker is located at Fort Sumter National Monument and only reached by boat. See links below for more information about access to the site. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Charleston SC 29412, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance
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of this marker. Casemates and Cannon (a few steps from this marker); Gorge Wall (a few steps from this marker); The Garrison Defending Fort Sumter (within shouting distance of this marker); Sally Port (within shouting distance of this marker); 42-Pounder, Banded and Rifled (within shouting distance of this marker); Battery Huger (within shouting distance of this marker); Fort Sumter 1861-65 (within shouting distance of this marker); Fort Sumter Today (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Charleston.
 
More about this marker. On the lower left is a floor plan showing the layout of the magazine. On the right is a line drawing depicting the magazine. Wood-lined masonry walls, five feet thick, kept powder dry and safe from sparks and flame. But on December 11, 1863, the inner magazine with its store of small arms and munitions mysteriously exploded, killing eleven Confederate soldiers. The leaning brick wall and archway, still visible today, show the force of the blast.
 
Powder Magazine Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Swain, May 3, 2010
2. Powder Magazine Marker
Powder Magazine and Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Swain, May 3, 2010
3. Powder Magazine and Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 30, 2020. It was originally submitted on May 19, 2010, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,039 times since then and 49 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on May 19, 2010, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.

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Apr. 18, 2024