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Downtown in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

New York Avenue Presbyterian Church at Herald Square

Civil War to Civil Rights

 

— Downtown Heritage Trail —

 
New York Avenue Presbyterian Church at Herald Square Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, July 11, 2010
1. New York Avenue Presbyterian Church at Herald Square Marker
Inscription.  
"The churches are needed
as never before
for divine services."
President Abraham Lincoln


So said President Lincoln from his pew in New York Avenue Presbyterian Church. While other churches were occupied by the federal government for offices and hospitals during the Civil War, Lincoln insisted this church remain open for worship. The pastor, Dr. Phineas D. Gurley, was the president’s spiritual guide through the war and during the fatal illness of Lincoln’s young son, Willie, who on his deathbed left his small savings of $5 to the church.

President Lincoln regularly traveled the short distance from the White House to attend this church, a congregation founded by Presbyterian carpenters on the grounds of the White House in 1793. Lincoln’s hitching post remains outside; his pew still stands in this somewhat enlarged, 1950s replica of the original church. President Lincoln also found solace in the church’s midweek Bible classes. He sequestered himself in an adjacent room with the door ajar lest he disturb others with his presence.

A document in Lincoln’s handwriting,
New York Avenue Presbyterian Church at Herald Square Marker: photo on revese image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, July 11, 2010
2. New York Avenue Presbyterian Church at Herald Square Marker: photo on revese
"New York Avenue Presbyterian Church presides over the intersection of H Street and New York Avenue about 1920, its missing steeple lost in a storm. (Library of Congress)"
proposing that the federal government end slavery by paying owners to free their slaves, is displayed in the church’s Lincoln parlor. The plan was carried out only in Washington, D.C.

The church dominates an area now called Herald Square, named for the Washington Times-Herald newspaper that once occupied the white building at 1307 New York Avenue. Here, publisher Eleanor Medill “Cissy” Patterson created the nation’s first round-the-clock newspaper, becoming one of the most powerful women in the country. Socialite, businesswomen, and political activist, she was a dominant force in the city’s political and social life until her death in 1948.

[Photo captions:]

above and left:
President Lincoln, seen here with his family in a portrait by William Sartain, attended New York Avenue Presbyterian Church regularly (National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; National Portrait Gallery) . Left, a version of the Emancipation Proclamation (Smithsonian Institution - Gift of Marvin Sadik).

above::
New York Avenue Presbyterian Church as it looked when the Lincolns attended (National Archives). The president used the hitching post, left, that remains on New York Avenue. (Richard Bush).

right:
Eleanor Medill “Cissy” Patterson at her desk as publisher of the Times-Herald
President Lincoln's Hitching Post, 1861 - 1865" image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, July 11, 2010
3. President Lincoln's Hitching Post, 1861 - 1865"
for which this square is named (C. Bettmann /CORBISS).

[Times-Herald headline, November 1940: “Roosevelt Wins!”] (The Washington Post Company.)
 
Erected by Cultural Tourism DC. (Marker Number W.4.)
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Abolition & Underground RRChurches & ReligionGovernment & PoliticsWar, US Civil. In addition, it is included in the Downtown Heritage Trail series list.
 
Location. 38° 53.994′ N, 77° 1.852′ W. Marker is in Downtown in Washington, District of Columbia. Marker is on New York Avenue Northwest (U.S. 50) west of H Street Northwest. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1313 New York Avenue Northwest, Washington DC 20005, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Historic New York Avenue Presbyterian Church (a few steps from this marker); Dorothea Dix 1802 - 1887 (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Church of the Epiphany (about 600 feet away); Jane Addams 1860 - 1935 (about 600 feet away); W.E.B. DuBois 1868 - 1963 & Mary White Ovington 1865-1951 (about 600 feet away); Luther and Charlotte Gulick
New York Avenue Presbyterian Church at Herald Square Marker and Lincoln's Hitching Post image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, July 11, 2010
4. New York Avenue Presbyterian Church at Herald Square Marker and Lincoln's Hitching Post
(about 600 feet away); Susan B. Anthony 1820 - 1906 (about 600 feet away); Harriet Tubman circa 1820 - 1913 (about 600 feet away).
 
Related marker. Click here for another marker that is related to this marker. To better understand the relationship, study each marker in the order shown.
 
Also see . . .
1. New York Avenue Presbyterian Church: History. (Submitted on July 11, 2010, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
2. Cissy Patterson. (Submitted on July 11, 2010, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
 
Additional keywords. journalism
 
New York Avenue Presbyterian Church at Herald Square Marker - lower left image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, July 11, 2010
5. New York Avenue Presbyterian Church at Herald Square Marker - lower left
Reverse Side of Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain
6. Reverse Side of Marker
The Church is stop W.4 on the Civil War to Civil Rights Downtown Heritage Trail.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 10, 2019. It was originally submitted on July 11, 2010, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. This page has been viewed 1,338 times since then and 22 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on July 11, 2010, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   6. submitted on August 19, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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Jul. 12, 2020