Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Fredericksburg, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Liberty Town

Fredericksburg: Timeless.

 
 
Liberty Town Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By J.T. Lambrou, August 12, 2021
1. Liberty Town Marker
Inscription.  
Seth Barton, 1755-1813, fought in the American Revolution, grew wealthy as a shipping merchant, and speculated in real estate. He laid out the subdivision that came to be called Liberty Town in 1812. He is buried at St. George’s Church.

Henry Deane was born a slave in Powhatan County, but arrived in Fredericksburg in 1868 as a free man. He worked for several local businesses but also managed his own livery and speculated in real estate.

This small community, laid out on the edge of town in 1812, greeted overland travelers with a wagon yard, a livery, a blacksmith, and a tavern/hotel. The tavern was called Rising Sun (later the Western Hotel) and stood on Liberty Street, to your front. It burned down in 1836.

Fredericksburg annexed Liberty Town, in 1851, and established a burial ground. Initially called Potters Field, it was later referred to as the Colored Cemetery. In 1861, the town allowed the burial there of 51 Confederate soldiers who had succumbed to disease in nearby encampments.

After the Civil War, the town curtailed burials and this area developed as an
Paid Advertisement
Click on the ad for more information.
Please report objectionable advertising to the Editor.
Click or scan to see
this page online
African-American neighborhood. Many of the graves were removed to the Shiloh Cemetery (opened in 1882), while new houses and commercial enterprises filled the streetscapes. The Fredericksburg High School, to your left, has occupied a prominent site since 1919 and students still use its related athletic field.

[Captions:]
Liberty Town is outlined in red on this 1890 map of Fredericksburg. The roads at odd angles to the street grid followed the terrain rather than the established street pattern.

African Americans buried in Potters Field were reinterred in the Shiloh Cemetery, at Littlepage Street and Monument Avenue.

Small dwellings characterized this post Civil War African-American community. The frame dwelling in this photo was located on the Liberty Street, to your front. The brick building in the background is still there.

Henry Deane built many of the small houses in Liberty Town, some of which are still visible.

 
Erected by Fredericksburg Economic Development and Tourism Office.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: African AmericansCemeteries & Burial SitesSettlements & Settlers
Liberty Town Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Kevin W., July 14, 2010
2. Liberty Town Marker
This is a previous iteration of the marker. While the information is identical, although the formatting was different and captions are shown in a different order.
War, US Civil. In addition, it is included in the Virginia, Fredericksburg: Timeless. series list. A significant historical year for this entry is 1812.
 
Location. 38° 18.046′ N, 77° 27.829′ W. Marker is in Fredericksburg, Virginia. Marker is at the intersection of George Street and Liberty Street, on the left when traveling west on George Street. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Fredericksburg VA 22401, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A Memorial Landscape (a few steps from this marker); Fredericksburg Roll of Honor (within shouting distance of this marker); The Barton Street Potter's Field (within shouting distance of this marker); Barton Street Confederate Monument (within shouting distance of this marker); 1850 (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Fredericksburg Cemeteries and the Corporation Burying Ground (about 400 feet away); From a Burying Ground to a Park (about 400 feet away); 1920 (about 500 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Fredericksburg.
 
Liberty Town Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Devry Becker Jones (CC0), March 4, 2023
3. Liberty Town Marker
Entrance to Shiloh Baptist Church Cemetery, mentioned on the marker. image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Kevin W., August 20, 2010
4. Entrance to Shiloh Baptist Church Cemetery, mentioned on the marker.
Modern view of houses on marker. image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Kevin W., August 20, 2010
5. Modern view of houses on marker.
The two small houses in this picture are featured on the marker.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on March 4, 2023. It was originally submitted on July 16, 2010, by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,607 times since then and 81 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on September 23, 2021, by J.T. Lambrou of New Boston, Michigan.   2. submitted on July 16, 2010, by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia.   3. submitted on March 4, 2023, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia.   4, 5. submitted on August 24, 2010, by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia.

Share this page.  
Share on Tumblr
m=33107

CeraNet Cloud Computing sponsors the Historical Marker Database.
This website earns income from purchases you make after using our links to Amazon.com. We appreciate your support.
Paid Advertisement
Apr. 24, 2024