Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Salt Lake City in Salt Lake County, Utah — The American Mountains (Southwest)
 

Pioneer Telegraph Office

 
 
Pioneer Telegraph Office Marker image. Click for full size.
By Beneathtimp via Wikimedia Commons (CC ), July 8, 2018
1. Pioneer Telegraph Office Marker
Inscription.  
At this location on October 18 1861 stood the telegraph pole, shown on above plaque, on which telegraph wires were joined which spanned a continent and united two oceans.

On that date the first two telegrams transmitted were as follows: Great Salt Lake City, U.T. Oct. 18, 1861 “Hon. J. H. Wade, President of the Pacific Telegraph Company Cleveland, Ohio:

“Sir: Permit me to congratulate you upon the completion of the overland telegraph line west to this city, to commend the energy displayed by yourself and associates in the rapid and successful prosecution of a work so beneficial, and to express the wish that its use may ever tend to promote the true interests of the dwellers upon both the Atlantic and Pacific slopes on the continent.

“Utah has not seceeded, but is firm for the constitution and laws of our once happy country, and is warmly interested in such useful enterprises as the one so far completed. Brigham Young.”

The reply was as follows: Cleveland Oct. 19, 1861 “Hon. Brigham Young, President Great Salt Lake City: Sir: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your message of last
Pioneer Telegraph Office Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Dawn Bowen, June 19, 2007
2. Pioneer Telegraph Office Marker
Click or scan to see
this page online
evening, which was every way gratifying, not only in the announcement of the completion of the Pacific Telegraph to your enterprising and prosperous city, but that your, the first message to pass over the line, should express so unmistakably the patriotism and union-loving sentiments of yourself and people.

“With just consideration for your high position and due respect for you personally. I am your obedient servant, J. H. Wade, Pres. Pacific Telegraph Company”

GSL City, Oct 18, 1861 ”To the President of the United States: Utah, whose citizens strenuously resist all imputations of disloyalty, congratulates the president upon the completion of an enterprise which spans the continent, unites two oceans, and connects with nerve of iron, the remote extremities of the body politic with the great government heart. May the whole system speedily thrill with the quickened pulsations of that heart, as the parricide hand is palsied, treason is banished, and the entire sisterhood of states join hands in glad reunion around the national fireside. Frank Fuller Acting Governor of the Utah Territory.”

Washington D. C., Oct. 20, ’61 “Hon. Frank Fuller, Acting Governor of Utah Sir: The completion of the telegraph to Great Salt Lake City is auspicious of the stability and union of the republic, the government reciprocates your congratulations. Abraham Lincoln.”
Marker location on South Main Street image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Dawn Bowen, June 19, 2007
3. Marker location on South Main Street

 
Erected 1955 by Sons of Utah Pioneers Memorial Foundation.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: CommunicationsNotable Events. In addition, it is included in the Sons of Utah Pioneers series list. A significant historical date for this entry is October 18, 1861.
 
Location. 40° 46.055′ N, 111° 53.455′ W. Marker is in Salt Lake City, Utah, in Salt Lake County. Marker is on Main Street north of 100 South, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 79 S Main St, Salt Lake City UT 84111, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. First Security Branch of Wells Fargo (a few steps from this marker); McIntyre Building (within shouting distance of this marker); Eagle Emporium Building (within shouting distance of this marker); The Old Clock (within shouting distance of this marker); City Creek (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Mountain States Telephone & Telegraph Building (about 700 feet away); Honor Thy Father and Thy Mother (about 700 feet away); The Salt Lake Theatre (about 700 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Salt Lake City.
 
Also see . . .
1. Wikipedia entry for First Transcontinental Telegraph. Excerpt
The first transcontinental telegraph (completed October 24, 1861)
Detail on marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Dawn Bowen, June 19, 2007
4. Detail on marker
was a line that connected the existing telegraph network in the eastern United States to a small network in California, by means of a link between Omaha, Nebraska and Carson City, Nevada, via Salt Lake City. It was a milestone in electrical engineering and in the formation of the United States of America.[1] It served as the only method of near-instantaneous communication between the east and west coasts during the 1860s.
(Submitted on October 2, 2021.) 

2. Western Union completes the first transcontinental telegraph line. This Day in History entry on History.com. Excerpt:
The push to create a transcontinental telegraph line had begun only a little more than year before when Congress authorized a subsidy of $40,000 a year to any company building a telegraph line that would join the eastern and western networks. The Western Union Telegraph Company, as its name suggests, took up the challenge, and the company immediately began work on the critical link that would span the territory between the western edge of Missouri and Salt Lake City.
(Submitted on October 2, 2021.) 
 
Plaque: Site of completion of overland telegraph line image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Dawn Bowen, June 19, 2007
5. Plaque: Site of completion of overland telegraph line
Construction of the First Transcontinental Telegraph Line image. Click for full size.
Engraving in Harper's Weekly from painting by George M. Ottinger, November 2, 1867
6. Construction of the First Transcontinental Telegraph Line
Image depicts a Pony Express rider passing the erection of telegraph poles that would render Pony Express message relays obsolete.
The Victorian Internet: The Story of the Telegraph and the 19th Century's On-line Pioneers image. Click for more information.
Advertisement via Amazon.com
7. The Victorian Internet: The Story of the Telegraph and the 19th Century's On-line Pioneers
2014 book by Tom Standage on Amazon.com. This fascinating story tells of not just the 19th century visionaries that pioneered the world-wide telegraph system, but of the telegraph operators and the on-line social network they created among themselves.
Click for more information.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 11, 2021. It was originally submitted on June 27, 2007, by Dawn Bowen of Fredericksburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 2,076 times since then and 39 times this year. Last updated on August 30, 2010, by Bryan R. Bauer of Kearns, Ut 84118. It was the Marker of the Week October 10, 2021. Photos:   1. submitted on October 2, 2021, by J. J. Prats of Powell, Ohio.   2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on June 27, 2007, by Dawn Bowen of Fredericksburg, Virginia.   6, 7. submitted on October 2, 2021, by J. J. Prats of Powell, Ohio. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page.

Share this page.  
Share on Tumblr
m=35085

Paid Advertisements
 
 

May. 28, 2022