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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Near Marxville in Dane County, Wisconsin — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Indian Lake

 
 
Indian Lake Marker image. Click for full size.
By William J. Toman, June 12, 2010
1. Indian Lake Marker
Inscription.  Indian Lake Park lies at the edge of the unglaciated or "driftless" area of southwestern Wisconsin. Here, features of both glaciated and unglaciated land are prominent. The steep slopes of exposed rock indicate that this valley was never completely covered with ice. Yet the large boulders found in the draws and on the valley floor could only have been brought here by a finger of ice, which fanned out from the main body of the glacier.

Indian Lake is one of many shallow kettle lakes in this area, created when the glacier retreated. The outwash plain by the lake was formed when glacial meltwater carried large quantities of silt and sand into the valley.

Plant life here is very diverse. The cool north-facing slope along the lake is dominated by paper birch, while on the hilltops ancient gnarled oaks are being crowded by younger hardwoods. An abundance of brambles and aspens indicate logging and grazing once took place in the woods.

For several hundred years Indians camped at the southwest end of the lake. During that period, the slopes on the hills above you were quite open and covered with prairie grasses and wildflowers.
Indian Lake Marker image. Click for full size.
By William J. Toman, June 12, 2010
2. Indian Lake Marker
Indian Lake in the background.
Frequent fast-moving prairie fires helped keep these areas free of trees. When settlers stopped the fires, trees began to fill in the open spaces. Today only a few small patches of prairie remain on the very dry southwest-facing slopes.
 
Erected 1977 by the Dane County Natural History Marker System.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Native AmericansNatural FeaturesSettlements & Settlers.
 
Location. 43° 11.365′ N, 89° 37.297′ W. Marker is near Marxville, Wisconsin, in Dane County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of State Highway 19 and Matz Road, on the left when traveling west. Marker is at the southwest corner of the parking lot at Indian Lake County Park. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Cross Plains WI 53528, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 6 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. St. Mary of the Oaks (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Matz Farmstead (approx. half a mile away); Indian Lake Passage (approx. 0.7 miles away); Kerl School (approx. 4 miles away); Father Adalbert Inama -- St. Norbert House (approx. 5 miles away); In Memory of Rev. Adalbert Inama, O. Praem. (approx. 5.1 miles away); The Plain Good Building of Cross Plains
Nearby Marker re Ronald J. Ripp image. Click for full size.
By William J. Toman, June 12, 2010
3. Nearby Marker re Ronald J. Ripp
"Now that you know where you are, do you know where you are going?"
(approx. 5.4 miles away); Haney's Tavern (approx. 5.8 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Marxville.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. This is a list of markers in the Dane County Natural History Marker System.
 
Station RON RIPP GPS image. Click for full size.
By William J. Toman, June 12, 2010
4. Station RON RIPP GPS
Near Indian Lake Marker image. Click for full size.
By William J. Toman, June 12, 2010
5. Near Indian Lake Marker
Setting for Ron Ripp markers at northwest corner of parking lot.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. It was originally submitted on June 12, 2010, by William J. Toman of Green Lake, Wisconsin. This page has been viewed 955 times since then and 32 times this year. Last updated on October 17, 2010, by William J. Toman of Green Lake, Wisconsin. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on June 12, 2010, by William J. Toman of Green Lake, Wisconsin. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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Oct. 22, 2020