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Selma in Dallas County, Alabama — The American South (East South Central)
 

In Honor of James Joseph Reeb

1927-1965

 

— “This Good Man” —

 
In Honor of James Joseph Reeb Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tim & Renda Carr, November 6, 2010
1. In Honor of James Joseph Reeb Marker
Inscription.  Rev. James J. Reeb, an Army Veteran and Unitarian minister from Casper, Wyoming, was working in Boston when Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. appealed for clergymen of all faiths to come to Selma to protest the violence that occurred at the Edmund Pettus Bridge on March 7, 1965, “Bloody Sunday.” Reeb responded by flying south for the protest march in Selma on March 9. A few hours after the march, Reeb and two fellow ministers were attacked while walking along Washington Street near the Silver Moon Café and across from the C. & C. Novelty Company. The attack left Reeb with a severe head injury, and he was rushed to a Birmingham Hospital where he died two days later, March 11. He left a wife and four children. “The life of this good man that was lost,” announced President Lyndon B. Johnson, “must strengthen the determination of each of us to bring full and equal and exact justice to all of our people.” The National outcry over Reeb’s death helped bring about the passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Churches & Religion
In Honor of James Joseph Reeb Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tim & Renda Carr, November 6, 2010
2. In Honor of James Joseph Reeb Marker
Civil Rights. In addition, it is included in the Unitarian Universalism (UUism) series list.
 
Location. 32° 24.522′ N, 87° 0.84′ W. Marker is in Selma, Alabama, in Dallas County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Martin Luther King Street and Water Avenue. Marker located on the front grounds of the Old Depot Museum. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 4 Martin Luther King Street, Selma AL 36703, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Selma Navy Yard and Ordnance Works (a few steps from this marker); Arsenal Anvil (within shouting distance of this marker); St. James Hotel (approx. ¼ mile away); Water Avenue (approx. ¼ mile away); Site of Selma-Dallas County’s 1st Bridge 1884-1940 (approx. ¼ mile away); This Tablet Commemorates the Visit of Lafayette (approx. ¼ mile away); Sgt Robert Weakley Patton (approx. ¼ mile away); George Washington Carver Homes Projects (approx. 0.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Selma.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. These are additional markers that mention or are about Rev. James Reeb
 
Also see . . .  James Reeb from Encyclopedia of Alabama. (Submitted on November 8, 2010, by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama.)
In Honor of James Joseph Reeb Marker Front Left Of The Old Depot Museum image. Click for full size.
By Tim & Renda Carr, November 6, 2010
3. In Honor of James Joseph Reeb Marker Front Left Of The Old Depot Museum

 
Additional keywords. Unitarian Universalism
 
In Honor of James Joseph Reeb Marker Stands To The Left Side of This Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tim & Renda Carr, November 6, 2010
4. In Honor of James Joseph Reeb Marker Stands To The Left Side of This Marker
The Old Depot Museum.
Image of James Joseph Reeb image. Click for full size.
By Tim & Renda Carr, November 6, 2010
5. Image of James Joseph Reeb
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 31, 2019. It was originally submitted on November 7, 2010, by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama. This page has been viewed 1,315 times since then and 74 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on November 7, 2010, by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama.   2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on November 8, 2010, by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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Sep. 24, 2020