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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Bowling Green in Warren County, Kentucky — The American South (East South Central)
 

The Confederate Monument

 
 
The Confederate Monument Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Chad Comer, December 30, 2010
1. The Confederate Monument Marker
Inscription.  This monument created due to the efforts of George B. Payne. In 1875 Payne lived in Topeka, Kansas. During the Civil War Payne was a private in the 4th Kentucky Infantry. He served as a courier for Gen. John C. Breckinridge and spent time during the war in Bowling Green.

Payne sought a fitting monument to honor those Confederate soldiers buried in Bowling Green. At his insistence the Warren County Monumental Association was formed. Thomas H. Hines, 9th Kentucky Cavalry of John Hunt Morgan’s command served as the president of the Association. A subscription drive was begun in 1875 and the monument was dedicated on May 3, 1876.

At the dedication ceremony over 10,000 people gathered to hear the speeches. The oration was delivered by W. C. P. Breckinridge, former colonel of the 9th Kentucky Cavalry and an important figure in Confederate veterans associations in Kentucky.

The monument cost $1,500.00. It was designed and created locally using white limestone. There are more 70 soldiers buried around the obelisk. Their bodies are buried in unique concentric circles around this impressive limestone shaft.

The
The Confederate Monument & Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Chad Comer, December 30, 2010
2. The Confederate Monument & Marker
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"Lost Cause"

This lithograph created by Henry Moseler was a popular image in the post-war South. It brought home the devastation wrought on the South by the Civil War. A likeness of this image was carved on the Bowling Green monument.
 
Erected by John Hunt Morgan Heritage Trail.
 
Topics. This historical marker and monument is listed in these topic lists: Cemeteries & Burial SitesWar, US Civil. A significant historical month for this entry is May 1664.
 
Location. 36° 59.524′ N, 86° 25.175′ W. Marker is in Bowling Green, Kentucky, in Warren County. Marker is at the intersection of Fairveiw Avenue (Kentucky Route 234) and St. Joseph Lane on Fairveiw Avenue. Located in Fairview Cemetery on Fairview Avenue in Bowling Green. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Bowling Green KY 42103, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Confederate Monument of Bowling Green (a few steps from this marker); Home of Thomas Hines (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); Shake Rag (approx. 0.8 miles away); Ora Porter (approx. 0.8 miles away); Western Kentucky University (approx. 0.9 miles away); The Bridge (approx. 0.9 miles away); Bowling Green & Warren County (approx. 0.9 miles away); The Barren River (approx. 0.9 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Bowling Green.
 
Additional commentary.
Confederate Monument closeup image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Mark Hilton, May 7, 2015
3. Confederate Monument closeup
1. Errors on text of marker.
Under the photo of Thomas Hines, on the marker, it incorrectly notes that Hines died before the monument was completed. Actually he lived another 22 years and his grave is in the same cemetery.

Also the right side lithograph lists the creator as Thomas Moseler instead of Henry Mosler.
    — Submitted September 8, 2018, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.
 
Unknown Confederates Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Mark Hilton, May 7, 2015
4. Unknown Confederates Marker
Confederate Regiments Camped here from different states. image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Mark Hilton, May 7, 2015
5. Confederate Regiments Camped here from different states.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 22, 2021. It was originally submitted on January 10, 2011, by Chad Comer of Gamaliel, Kentucky. This page has been viewed 985 times since then and 16 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on January 10, 2011, by Chad Comer of Gamaliel, Kentucky.   3, 4, 5. submitted on June 1, 2015, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.

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May. 27, 2022