Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Williams Bay in Walworth County, Wisconsin — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

The 755th Aircraft Control and Warning Squadron

 
 
The 755th Aircraft Control and Warning Squadron Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Paul F, February 18, 2011
1. The 755th Aircraft Control and Warning Squadron Marker
North side of two sided marker
Inscription.  
Side A
The Williams Bay Air Force Radar Station, home of the 755th Aircraft Control and Warning Squadron, was part of a nationwide Cold War effort to defend the continent against possible airborne attack from the Soviet Union. In the years following World War II, as tensions between the United States and Soviet Union escalated, Air Force engineers worked feverishly to develop a sophisticated radar technology suitable for a nationwide network of defensive stations.

Side B
The system did not gain wide support until the Soviet Union exploded their first atomic bomb in August 1949. The Williams Bay station became operational in 1950. Built on one of the highest elevations in the region, its two radomes scanned the skies 24 hours a day for the ten years it was active. The 755th operated in relative secrecy, ready to provide instant communications about suspicious aircraft to the regional processing centers at Truax Field in Madison and O’Hare Field in Chicago. Through the 1950s the Air Force rapidly built a nationwide network of radar stations. By 1957, the system consisted of over 200 stations. That year, the successful

The 755th Aircraft Control and Warning Squadron Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Paul F, February 18, 2011
2. The 755th Aircraft Control and Warning Squadron Marker
South side of the two sided marker
Click or scan to see
this page online
Soviet Sputnik satellite launch changed the focus of aerial defense from aircraft to ballistic missiles and the radar defense network was gradually decommissioned and consolidated.
 
Erected by Wisconsin Historical Society Sponsored by Eugene N. Shreves and Allan J. Mullen. (Marker Number 505.)
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: War, Cold. In addition, it is included in the Wisconsin Historical Society series list. A significant historical year for this entry is 1949.
 
Location. 42° 37.005′ N, 88° 32.421′ W. Marker is in Williams Bay, Wisconsin, in Walworth County. Marker can be reached from State Highway 67, ¼ mile south of Palmer Road, on the right when traveling north. Located off the highway in the entrance to the Highway 67 Industrial Park. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: N3440 STH 67, Williams Bay WI 53191, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 9 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. The Webster House (approx. 3.6 miles away); Birthplace of “The Greatest Show on Earth” (approx. 5.1 miles away); Maple Park (approx. 5.6 miles away); Andy Gump (approx. 5.7 miles away); The Old Mill Race (approx. 5.8 miles away); Wisconsin's First School for the Deaf
The 755th Aircraft Control and Warning Squadron Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Paul F, February 18, 2011
3. The 755th Aircraft Control and Warning Squadron Marker
(approx. 6 miles away); Wisconsin's First 4-H Club (approx. 6.2 miles away); John Bruce (approx. 8.7 miles away).
 
Regarding The 755th Aircraft Control and Warning Squadron. The Highway 67 Industrial Park contains the remains of the Air Force facility.
 
The 755th Aircraft Control and Warning Squadron Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Paul F, February 18, 2011
4. The 755th Aircraft Control and Warning Squadron Marker
Aerial photo of the facility from the front of the marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. It was originally submitted on February 23, 2011, by Paul Fehrenbach of Germantown, Wisconsin. This page has been viewed 1,193 times since then and 170 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on February 23, 2011, by Paul Fehrenbach of Germantown, Wisconsin. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.

Share this page.  
Share on Tumblr
m=40472

CeraNet Cloud Computing sponsors the Historical Marker Database.
Paid Advertisements
 
 

Oct. 7, 2022