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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Diamond in Newton County, Missouri — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

The Moses Carver Farm

 
 
The Moses Carver Farm Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By William Fischer, Jr., January 22, 2011
1. The Moses Carver Farm Marker
Inscription.  
The farm on which George Washington Carver grew up was owned by Moses and Susan Carver. While George’s path in life took him far from here, he considered this farm his first home.

In the 1830s, Moses and Susan Carver moved from Sangamon County, Illinois, to Newton County, Missouri, along with Moses’ brothers Richard, George, Abram, and Solomon and their families. Working together they broke the prairie land with wooden plows. The U.S. government encouraged westward expansion of the nation, but Moses Carver was unable to purchase his land until 1843, when the United States Land Office first offered it for sale. Eventually Moses Carver’s farm grew into 240 acres of crop fields, orchards, and grazing pastures for horses, cattle, mules, sheep, and oxen. The farm produced corn, wheat, oats, Irish potatoes, hay, and flax. In 1855 the Carvers purchased a 13-year old enslaved girl. She gave birth to two boys, but was then abducted. Moses and Susan raised the boys and gave them chores to help with the farm. Jim was strong, but George was frail and only able to do lighter work, like sewing and fetching water from the spring. In time,
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George discovered in himself a need to learn that required him to leave the farm he had grown to love.
 
Erected by National Park Service.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: African AmericansAgricultureEducationScience & Medicine. In addition, it is included in the George Washington Carver series list. A significant historical year for this entry is 1843.
 
Location. 36° 59.162′ N, 94° 21.313′ W. Marker is near Diamond, Missouri, in Newton County. Marker is on the George Washington Carver National Monument Visitor Center viewing porch. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 5646 Carver Road, Diamond MO 64840, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. George Washington Carver National Monument (here, next to this marker); George Washington Carver's Birthplace (here, next to this marker); George Washington Carver's Thoughts (within shouting distance of this marker); Birthplace of George Washington Carver (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); What an Orphan Chooses to Forget - and Remember (about 400 feet away); Special Moments in the Woods (about 500 feet away); Moses Carver Family Cemetery (about 600 feet away); Williams' Spring (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Diamond.
The Moses Carver Farm Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By William Fischer, Jr., January 22, 2011
2. The Moses Carver Farm Marker
On left

 
Also see . . .
1. George Washington Carver National Monument. National Park Service website entry (Submitted on April 26, 2011, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.) 

2. George Washington Carver. Famous Missourians website entry (Submitted on April 26, 2011, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.) 

3. Tuskegee Institute National Historic Site. National Park Service website entry (Submitted on April 26, 2011, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.) 
 
Photo on Moses Carver Farm Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By National Park Service, undated
3. Photo on Moses Carver Farm Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on March 9, 2022. It was originally submitted on April 26, 2011, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 1,345 times since then and 69 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on April 26, 2011, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.

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Apr. 23, 2024