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New London in New London County, Connecticut — The American Northeast (New England)
 

John Winthrop

1606 – 1676

 
 
John Winthrop Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Bill Coughlin, October 9, 2011
1. John Winthrop Marker
Inscription.  
Founder of New London
May 6, 1646
Governor of Connecticut
1657, 1659-1676
---------------
The Charter of Connecticut
was procured by him
from King Charles II
April 23, 1662
---------------
To commemorate
his great services
to this commonwealth
the State of Connecticut
erects this monument
A.D. 1905
---------------

 
Erected 1905 by State of Connecticut.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Colonial EraGovernment & Politics. A significant historical month for this entry is April 1931.
 
Location. 41° 21.513′ N, 72° 6.045′ W. Marker is in New London, Connecticut, in New London County. Marker is at the intersection of Hempstead Street and Bulkeley Place, on the right when traveling north on Hempstead Street. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: New London CT 06320, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. City of New London (here, next to this marker); Jonathan Brooks Tomb   1786 (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Hempstead Historic District (about
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600 feet away); Williams Memorial Park (about 600 feet away); 21st Regt. Conn. Vol. (about 600 feet away); New London War Dead (approx. 0.2 miles away); Nathan Hale (approx. 0.2 miles away); New London War Memorial (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in New London.
 
More about this marker. The monument consists of a statue atop a boulder on which the marker is affixed.
 
John Winthrop Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Bill Coughlin, October 9, 2011
2. John Winthrop Marker
Marker in New London image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Bill Coughlin, October 9, 2011
3. Marker in New London
Closeup of John Winthrop image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Bill Coughlin, October 9, 2011
4. Closeup of John Winthrop
Artist's Mark image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Bill Coughlin, October 9, 2011
5. Artist's Mark
John Winthrop image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Allen C. Browne, August 9, 2015
6. John Winthrop
This undated portrait of John Winthrop by an unknown artist hangs in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, DC.

“His contemporaries thought he was the most powerful individual in Massachusetts, and historians agree on John Winthrop's profound importance in early New England. He was the founder and first governor (reelected eleven times) of a colony established by reformed Protestants, or Puritans, so that they could practice their religion free from the interference of the English church. This did not make Winthrop and the Puritans believers in religious freedom, a concept most regarded as incompatible with political and social stability. In his use of the biblical phrase a ‘City upon a Hill,‘ Winthrop did not proclaim the colony a model, but warned that failure would allow others ‘to speak evil’ of God. He was not a modern ‘democrat,” but transformed the colony from a mercantile corporation to a common wealth, and believed that leaders ultimately owed their position to the voters.” — National Portrait Gallery
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 8, 2019. It was originally submitted on October 11, 2011, by Bill Coughlin of Woodland Park, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 807 times since then and 38 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on October 11, 2011, by Bill Coughlin of Woodland Park, New Jersey.   6. submitted on August 29, 2015, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.

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Jun. 12, 2024