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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Saratoga Springs in Saratoga County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Solomon Northup

 
 
Solomon Northrup Marker image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, October 10, 2011
1. Solomon Northrup Marker
Inscription.  
Born 1808 A Free Man. Lured
from Saratoga, kidnapped &
sold into slavery, 1841;
rescued, 1853. Author,
"Twelve Years A Slave".
City of Saratoga Springs 1999

 
Erected 1999 by Saratoga Springs.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Abolition & Underground RRAfrican AmericansCivil Rights. A significant historical year for this entry is 1808.
 
Location. 43° 4.71′ N, 73° 47.175′ W. Marker is in Saratoga Springs, New York, in Saratoga County. Marker is on Broadway (New York State Route 9) near Congress Street, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Saratoga Springs NY 12866, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. These Gates (within shouting distance of this marker); Columbian Spring (within shouting distance of this marker); The 77th Regiment, New York Volunteers (within shouting distance of this marker); Congress Spring (within shouting distance of this marker); Congress Park (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Deer Park Spring (about 500 feet away); World War Memorial Pavillion (about 600 feet away); M.C. Illions Carousel (about 600 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Saratoga Springs.
 
Regarding Solomon Northup.
Solomon Northrup Marker - Broadway in Saratoga Springs image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, October 10, 2011
2. Solomon Northrup Marker - Broadway in Saratoga Springs
Click or scan to see
this page online
Solomon Northup was born a free man in Minerva, New York, July 1808. Solomon was a literate man who worked on the Champlain Canal, was a carpenter and inventor. While working as a cabbie and violinist in Saratoga Springs, he was abducted, held in a slave pen in Washington, DC, and sold into slavery in Louisiana for 12 years before regaining his freedom. Citizens of Saratoga Springs and surrounding areas were instrumental in arranging for Solomon's release in 1853 and return to Saratoga.

Mr. Northup published his autobiography, Twelve Years a Slave, in 1853 about his ordeal. It is believed he traveled throughout the region selling his book and speaking out against slavery and was himself an abolitionist. Although Mr. Northup sought to bring his captors to trial, they were never prosecuted and he mysteriously disappeared. To date, his burial site has not been identified and it is not known whether or not he was killed, re-captured, or died of natural causes.

In 1999, former Saratoga Springs Mayor J. Michael O'Connell proclaimed Solomon Northup Day and an historical marker was placed at the corner of Congress and Broadway along with an exhibit panel inside the Heritage Park Visitor Center commemorating Mr. Northup's life. At this event, approximately 40 Northup family descendants from four states, including matriarch Victoria Northup Linzy Dunham, age 90.

In Saratoga Springs the annual Solomon Northup Day is held the third Saturday in July at the Saratoga Springs Urban Heritage Park Visitor Center. This event includes an art exhibition, book displays,
Solomon Northup Marker - Looking North Along Broadway image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, October 10, 2011
3. Solomon Northup Marker - Looking North Along Broadway
and other historical and educational information on the underground railroad and local community history.
 
Also see . . .
1. Presentation of the Northup Historical Marker, July 1999. Photo of Northup descendants assembled with Saratoga Springs Mayor O'Connell after the Presentation of a Northup Historical Marker in July 1999 (Submitted on December 11, 2011, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York.) 

2. About Solomon Northup. National Underground Railroad Freedom Center website entry (Submitted on November 22, 2021, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York.) 

3. Twelve Years A Slave by Solomon Northrup, electronic version. (Submitted on December 11, 2011, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York.)
4. Solomon Northup: His Life Before and After Slavery. Website for the 2012 book by David Fiske. (Submitted on February 15, 2012.) 

5. Library of Congress recognizes Solomon Northup history. Historical marker worded by Clifford Brown, Ph. D. and Renee Moore, Founder/Director of Solomon Northup Day and erected by Mayor, J. Michael O'Connell. 1999. (Submitted on September 5, 2020, by Renee Moore of Saratoga Springs, New York.) 
 
Additional commentary.
1. Solomon Northup Movie
As early as August 2011 word was out that Brad Pitt has joined the cast as producer of Steve McQueen’s upcoming adaptation of Solomon Northrup’s autobiography ‘Twelve Years A Slave.’ Pitt will be starring alongside Chiwetel Ejiofor, who’s been cast as the lead, and Michael Fassbender, who previously worked
Solomon Northup as a Slave image. Click for full size.
4. Solomon Northup as a Slave
This drawing is from Northup's autobiagraphy, "Twelve Years A Slave"
with McQueen on ‘Hunger,’ and ‘Shame.’ At that time there were no details regarding either Pitt or Fassbender’s roles in the movie.
    — Submitted December 11, 2011, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York.

2. History of Solomon Northup Day
In July 1808, Solomon Northup, an accomplished violinist, and inventor, was born a free man in Minerva, New York. Mr. Northup lived and worked in Saratoga Springs with his family for part of his life. He worked at the landmark Grand Union Hotel as well as other hotels as a cabbie and violinist. Solomon was abducted in 1841, held in a slave pen in Washington, DC, and sold into slavery in Louisiana for 12 years.

Through the efforts of Canadian, Samuel Bass, both black and white citizens of Saratoga, Hudson Falls (Sandy Hill) and Louisiana were instrumental in restoring his freedom in 1853. A literate man Mr. Northup published his autobiography entitled Twelve Years a Slave, in 1853.

In 1999, in recognition of his life’s work his ordeal and that of other African-Americans, native Saratogian, Renee Moore, founded Solomon Northup Day - A Celebration of Freedom. This historical and educational community event received recognition by the Library of Congress Bicentennial Local Legacies Project, in 2000. An historical marker at the corner of Congress and Broadway marks the point of abduction and inside an exhibit panel at the Saratoga Visitor Center commemorates Mr. Northup's life.

Under the leadership of former
2014 Reprint of Solomon Northup’s <i>12 Years a Slave</i> image. Click for more information.
via Amazon.com, with ‘Look Inside”
5. 2014 Reprint of Solomon Northup’s 12 Years a Slave
Mayor J. Michael O’Connell(R) a historical marker was erected at the corner of Congress and Broadway. Northup descendants from four states attend the event. Family matriarch and California resident Victoria Northup Linzy Dunham, lived to age 98.

Although Mr. Northup sought to bring his captors to trial, they were never prosecuted and he mysteriously disappeared. To date, his burial site has not been identified and it is not known whether or not he was killed, re-captured, or died of natural causes. “The celebration of this day remains a way of ‘remembering’ so that we, as Americans, don’t forget how far we have come and to encourage youth to speak-up for human freedom and justice.” —R. Moore
    — Submitted September 5, 2020, by Renee Moore of Saratoga Springs, New York.

 
Additional keywords. Seekers of Freedom Slavery Abolition Kidnapped into Slavery Plantation Life Brad Pitt Saratoga movie
 
Solomon Northup: His Life Before and After Slavery image. Click for more information.
via Amazon.com
7. Solomon Northup: His Life Before and After Slavery
2012 book by David Fiske.
Click for more information.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 27, 2021. It was originally submitted on December 11, 2011, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York. This page has been viewed 2,601 times since then and 157 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on December 11, 2011, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York.   5, 6, 7. submitted on September 6, 2020, by J. J. Prats of Powell, Ohio. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.

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Nov. 29, 2021