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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

St. Petersburg in Pinellas County, Florida — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

The History of Princess Hirrihigua

 
 
The History of Princess Hirrihigua Marker image. Click for full size.
By AGS Media, December 8, 2011
1. The History of Princess Hirrihigua Marker
Inscription.  In 1526 Juan Ortiz, a member of the expedition sent from Cuba to find Panfilo De Narvaez, was captured by Timucan Indians. Chief Hirrihigua, their ruler, hated the white men because of the violence of Narvaez. Juan Ortiz was condemned to death but Princess Hirrihigua, eldest daughter of the Chief, pleaded with her father and saved his life. Princess Hirrihigua saved Ortiz from death three times, and when his life was again in danger, she helped him escape to the sub-Timucan tribe of Chief Mucoso, her bethrothed. Chief Hirrihigua was so angered by the escape of Ortiz that he refused to allow Princess Hirrihigua to marry Chief Mucoso. In 1539 Hernando de Soto rescued Ortiz, who became his guide and interpreter.

Erected by the Princess Hirrihigua Chapter
of the Daughters of the American Revolution
to commemorate their fiftieth anniversary
1910 - 1960

 
Erected 1960 by the Princess Hirrihigua Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Exploration
The History of Princess Hirrihigua Marker image. Click for full size.
By AGS Media, December 8, 2011
2. The History of Princess Hirrihigua Marker
Below the marker sits a plaque which reads:

In appreciation to
Mr. Ed C. Wright
for donating this historic site
to the City of St. Petersburg
December, 1958
Native AmericansWomen. In addition, it is included in the Daughters of the American Revolution series list.
 
Location. 27° 42.239′ N, 82° 39.495′ W. Marker is in St. Petersburg, Florida, in Pinellas County. Marker is on Mound Place west of Bethel Way South, on the right when traveling west. The marker is located at Indian Mound Park, a small park and historic site of the City of St. Petersburg. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Saint Petersburg FL 33705, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 5 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. St. Bartholomew's Church (approx. 2˝ miles away); First Settlement and Post Office (approx. 3.1 miles away); Gulfport Casino (approx. 3.8 miles away); St. Mary, Our Lady of Grace Church (approx. 4.4 miles away); Rattlesnake Curve (approx. 4˝ miles away); World's First Regularly Scheduled Commercial Airline (approx. 4.6 miles away); World Record (approx. 4.7 miles away); Tierra Verde Mound (approx. 4.8 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in St. Petersburg.
 
More about this marker. The marker is located at the base of shell mound left by the Native American tribe which inhabited the region before European colonization. The mound has been known as the Princess Hirrihigua Temple Mound, the Pinellas Point Mound, Tocobaga Indian Mound, and other names over the years. The mound and park sit amidst a residential area of the city. The lot containing the mound was donated to St. Petersburg by Mr. Ed C. Wright in 1958.
 
Regarding The History of Princess Hirrihigua. The Native American tribe which inhabited the shores of Tampa Bay before Europeans arrived has been misidentified
The History of Princess Hirrihigua Marker image. Click for full size.
By AGS Media, December 8, 2011
3. The History of Princess Hirrihigua Marker
Behind the marker rises the temple mound of the Tocobaga Indians.
over the years as the Timucan or Timucua, or the Calusa. In reality, neither of these tribes called the area home, as the Timucua were located far to the north, and the Calusa to the south. The tribe which was centered in the Tampa Bay area, and to which Princess Hirrihigua belonged, was known as the Tocobaga.
 
Also see . . .  Story of a Florida Pocahontas: Juan Ortiz and Princess Hirrihigua. from ExploreSouthernHistory.com (Submitted on December 13, 2011, by Glenn Sheffield of Tampa, Florida.) 
 
Steps up the Tocobaga Temple Mound image. Click for full size.
By AGS Media, December 8, 2011
4. Steps up the Tocobaga Temple Mound
The Tocobaga Temple Mound image. Click for full size.
By AGS Media, December 8, 2011
5. The Tocobaga Temple Mound
Banyan trees at the base of the temple mound image. Click for full size.
By AGS Media, December 8, 2011
6. Banyan trees at the base of the temple mound
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on May 4, 2018. It was originally submitted on December 13, 2011, by Glenn Sheffield of Tampa, Florida. This page has been viewed 1,321 times since then and 8 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on December 13, 2011, by Glenn Sheffield of Tampa, Florida. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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Jan. 18, 2021