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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Wichita in Sedgwick County, Kansas — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

Thirty-Four Star Flag (1861)

Bicentennial Flag Memorial

 
 
Thirty-Four Star Flag (1861) Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., September 4, 2011
1. Thirty-Four Star Flag (1861) Marker
Inscription.  
Between 1818 and 1861 no less than 13 changes were made in the Stars and Stripes as a result of the westward expansion. With the admission of Kansas in 1861, the [S]tars and [S]tripes became a thirty-four star flag. It was this flag that would be carried by the North many times during the Civil War. It first served under fire June 21, 1861 along a little creek in northern Virginia called Bull Run. The rising sectional hatred and the secession of southern states produced sentiment to change the flag's design which would better reflect the new association or lack thereof.

Some wanted to remove a star for each seceded state. Others wanted to omit stars for the border states as well. And some even wanted to reduce the number of stripes to reflect the secession of four of the original thirteen colonies. President Lincoln received perhaps the oddest proposal from Samuel F.B. Morse, the inventor of the telegraph. His idea was to divide the flag diagonally with the upper twenty-three stars and stripes going to the North and the lower eleven stars and stripes going to the South.

President Lincoln gave firm "No's" to all suggested
Bicentennial Flag Memorial image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr.
2. Bicentennial Flag Memorial
Click or scan to see
this page online
tinkering, saying that this was not a war between two nations but an insurrection of eleven states against the lawful federal government. In his view, the seceding states still remained in the Union and the national flag should remain unchanged.
 
Erected by City of Wichita and Sons of the American Revolution.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Government & PoliticsPatriots & PatriotismWar, US Civil. In addition, it is included in the Former U.S. Presidents: #16 Abraham Lincoln, and the Sons of the American Revolution series lists. A significant historical date for this entry is June 21, 1861.
 
Location. 37° 41.391′ N, 97° 20.653′ W. Marker is in Wichita, Kansas, in Sedgwick County. Memorial is in Veterans Memorial Park. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 339 North Greenway, Wichita KS 67202, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Stars and Stripes (1818) (here, next to this marker); Forty-Five Star Flag (here, next to this marker); Flag of Fifteen Stripes (here, next to this marker); Forty-Eight Star Flag (here, next to this marker); French Tricolor (here, next to this marker); Thirteen Star Flag (Bennington Flag) (here, next to this marker); Fifty Star Flag
Thirty-Four Star Flag (1861) image. Click for full size.
By Unknown, undated
3. Thirty-Four Star Flag (1861)
(here, next to this marker); Grand Union Flag (a few steps from this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Wichita.
 
Also see . . .
1. 34-Star Flag History. (Submitted on July 1, 2012, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
2. Veterans Memorial Park of Wichita. (Submitted on July 1, 2012, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 17, 2020. It was originally submitted on July 1, 2012, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 443 times since then and 5 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on July 1, 2012, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.   2. submitted on June 30, 2012, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.   3. submitted on July 1, 2012, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.

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Apr. 17, 2021