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New York in New York County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Wavertree

1885

 
 
Wavertree Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, September 15, 2012
1. Wavertree Marker
Inscription.  
Wavertree was built at Southampton, England in 1885 for R.W. Leyland & Company of Liverpool. She was first employed to carry jute, used in making rope and burlap bags, between eastern India (now Bangladesh) and Scotland. When less than two years old she entered the tramp trades, taking cargoes anywhere in the world she could find them. After sailing for a quarter century, she limped into the Falkland Islands in December 1910, having been almost totally dismasted in a gale off Cape Horn. Rather than re-rigging her, her owners sold her for use as a floating warehouse at Punta Arenas, Chile. She was converted into a sand barge at Buenos Aires, Argentina in 1947, and acquired there by the South Street Seaport Museum in 1968 for eventual restoration to her appearance as a sailing vessel.

By the time Wavertree was built, she was nearly obsolete. Steam engines suitable for efficiently propelling ships across the ocean had been introduced in the 1870s and were being used on nearly all the shorter trade routes. While this was taking place, iron – long the choice of ship builders in iron producing countries, such as England
<i>Wavertree</i> image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, September 15, 2012
2. Wavertree
– was giving way to steel. Wavertree was one of the last large sailing ships built of wrought iron. She is today the largest afloat.

Most countries stopped building large sailing ships altogether in the first decade of this century. The last cargo-carrying sailing ship was launched in Germany in 1926. The last two to round Cape Horn with cargoes did so in 1949, carrying grain from Australia to Europe.

Extreme length: 325
Construction: Iron hull
Rig height: 167
Length on deck: 363
Draft: 22 (loaded)
Gross tonnage: 2,170
Beam: 40.2
Rig: Full-rigged ship
Net tonnage: 2,118
South Street Seaport Museum

 
Erected by South Street Seaport Museum.
 
Location. 40° 42.321′ N, 74° 0.229′ W. Marker is in New York, New York, in New York County. Marker can be reached from South Street west of Fulton Street. Marker is at the northwest end of the Wavertree's dock on the grounds of the South Street Seaport complex. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: New York NY 10038, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. High Water Mark (within shouting distance of this marker); Peking (was within shouting distance of this marker but has been reported permanently removed. ); 170-6 John Street, 86 South Street
<i>Wavertree</i> Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, September 15, 2012
3. Wavertree Marker
(within shouting distance of this marker); Urban Archeology/Then and Now (within shouting distance of this marker); Archaeological Discovery/Making Land (within shouting distance of this marker); Fulton Fish Market and Pier 17 (was about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line but has been reported missing. ); 207 - 211 Water Street (about 600 feet away); 203 Front Street (about 600 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in New York.
 
Also see . . .  Wavertree. (Submitted on September 17, 2012, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
 
Additional keywords. windjammer
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceWaterways & Vessels
 
<i>Wavertree</i> image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, September 15, 2012
4. Wavertree
 

More. Search the internet for Wavertree.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 1, 2018. This page originally submitted on September 17, 2012, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. This page has been viewed 380 times since then and 3 times this year. Last updated on October 3, 2012, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on September 17, 2012, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   3, 4. submitted on October 2, 2012, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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