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Yorktown in York County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Nelson House, circa 1730

Historic Yorktown

— Colonial National Historical Park —

 
 
Nelson House, circa 1730 Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Don Morfe, December 9, 2011
1. Nelson House, circa 1730 Marker
Inscription.  
"General Nelson…was excelled by no man in the generosity of his nature, in the nobleness of his sentiments, in the purity of his Revolutionary principles, and in the exalted patriotism that answered every service and sacrifice that his country might need." James Madison, 1789

Thomas Nelson, Jr.'s legacy is a lasting example of a life dedicated to independence for his country.

His support towards political freedom from Great Britain began while a member of Virginia’s colonial legislature. In addition to protesting British taxes and leading Yorktown's tea party, patterned after the one in Boston, he was one of Virginia's delegates to the Continental Congress.

In May 1776, he advocated that Virginia officially support independence—a proposal that helped lead to the Declaration of Independence signed by Nelson and 55 others. Nelson continued to support the revolution through political channels and used his own funds to purchase military supplies. On June 12, 1781, he was elected the third governor of Virginia and faced the greatest challenge of his public career—the invasion
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of the British army.

As governor and general of his state's militia, Nelson participated in the victory at Yorktown. One day after the British surrendered, Governor Thomas Nelson, Jr. wrote to the Continental Congress: “…the whole loss sustained by the Enemy…must be between 6 & 7000 men. This Blow, I think, must be a decisive one.”

In November 1781, Nelson resigned as governor, poor in health and in debt. He died on January 4, 1789, and was buried next to his father and grandfather at Grace Church, just one block from his home.

[Captions:]
On September 25, 1781, Governor Thomas Nelson, Jr. wrote Lord Cornwallis asking that citizens of Yorktown be permitted to return to town to move out their belongings. Three days later, the American and French armies reached Yorktown and the siege began.

One of the few tangible reminders of Thomas Nelson’s sacrifice for independence is his home, which still bears scars from Allied cannon fire during the 1781 siege.

Nelson’s grandfather, Thomas, built the house around 1730. The Nelson family retained ownership of the house until 1908. In 1968, the National Park Service purchased the house and restored it to its 18th century appearance.

In the 18th century there were six outbuilding on the northwest side of the Nelson House. By the early 1900s, only

Nelson House, circa 1730 Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Devry Becker Jones (CC0), February 26, 2021
2. Nelson House, circa 1730 Marker
The marker has experienced significant weather damage.
the chimney from the kitchen remained.

 
Erected by National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Colonial EraPatriots & PatriotismWar, US Revolutionary. In addition, it is included in the Former U.S. Presidents: #04 James Madison series list. A significant historical date for this entry is January 4, 1789.
 
Location. 37° 14.066′ N, 76° 30.428′ W. Marker is in Yorktown, Virginia, in York County. Marker is on Main Street west of Nelson Street, on the left when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 507 Main St, Yorktown VA 23690, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. William Nelson House Site (a few steps from this marker); The Great Valley (within shouting distance of this marker); Sessions-Pope-Sheild Property (within shouting distance of this marker); Charles Cox House (within shouting distance of this marker); William Rogers' (the "poor potter") Pottery Ruins (within shouting distance of this marker); Comte de Grasse (within shouting distance of this marker); Early Colonial Custom House (within shouting distance of this marker); Dudley Digges House, circa 1760 (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Yorktown.
 
Also see . . .
Nelson House, circa 1730 Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By J. Makali Bruton, October 23, 2016
3. Nelson House, circa 1730 Marker
The marker is at the far right in this view, to the west along the wall in front of the Nelson House.

1. The Nelson House. Yorktown Battlefield, Colonial National Historical Park Virginia (Submitted on December 5, 2012.) 

2. Signer of the Declaration of Independence - Thomas Nelson Jr. 5:39 minute YouTube video.
(Submitted on May 12, 2020.) 
 
Nelson House, circa 1730 Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By J. Makali Bruton, October 23, 2016
4. Nelson House, circa 1730 Marker
<i>Yorktown, Va. Thomas Nelson house (right), used as a hospital;…</i> image. Click for full size.
circa 1862
5. Yorktown, Va. Thomas Nelson house (right), used as a hospital;…
From: Civil War photographs, 1861-1865 / compiled by Hirst D. Milhollen and Donald H. Mugridge, Washington, D.C. : Library of Congress, 1977. No. 0045. Photo courtesy of the Library of Congress.
Nelson House image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Don Morfe, December 9, 2011
6. Nelson House
<i>Nelson House and Main Street, Yorktown, Virginia</i> image. Click for full size.
Postcard by the Detroit Photographic Company, 1902
7. Nelson House and Main Street, Yorktown, Virginia
Nelson House and Stores image. Click for full size.
Photographed By J. Makali Bruton, October 23, 2016
8. Nelson House and Stores
An attempt to match the Civil War era photograph seen in photo #5.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on March 1, 2021. It was originally submitted on December 5, 2012, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Maryland. This page has been viewed 886 times since then and 68 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on December 5, 2012, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Maryland.   2. submitted on March 1, 2021, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia.   3, 4. submitted on October 24, 2016, by J. Makali Bruton of Accra, Ghana.   5. submitted on December 27, 2014.   6. submitted on December 5, 2012, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Maryland.   7. submitted on December 27, 2014.   8. submitted on October 24, 2016, by J. Makali Bruton of Accra, Ghana. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.

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May. 27, 2024