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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Sullivans Island in Charleston County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Traverse c.1820

 
 
Traverse   c.1820 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 3, 2013
1. Traverse   c.1820 Marker
Inscription.  
This solid brick structure protected the entrance to the main powder magazine from enemy projectiles.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Forts and CastlesWar, US Civil.
 
Location. 32° 45.574′ N, 79° 51.486′ W. Marker is in Sullivans Island, South Carolina, in Charleston County. Marker can be reached from Middle Street, on the left when traveling east. Marker is located at Fort Moultrie National Monument. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Sullivans Island SC 29482, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Powder Magazine (here, next to this marker); Harbor Defense 1809-1860 (a few steps from this marker); Enlisted Men's Barracks (a few steps from this marker); Defending Charleston 1861-1865 (within shouting distance of this marker); Oceola / Patapsco Dead (within shouting distance of this marker); Northwest Bastionet (within shouting distance of this marker); Move a 50,000 pound Rodman Gun (within shouting distance of this marker); Building Forts (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Sullivans Island.
 
Also see . . .
Traverse c.1820 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 3, 2013
2. Traverse c.1820 Marker
Click or scan to see
this page online
 Fort Moultrie. National Park Service website. (Submitted on August 22, 2013, by Bill Coughlin of Woodland Park, New Jersey.) 
 
Marker at Fort Moultrie image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 3, 2013
3. Marker at Fort Moultrie
During the Civil Wall, this structure protected the fort during a bombardment.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. It was originally submitted on August 22, 2013, by Bill Coughlin of Woodland Park, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 340 times since then and 7 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on August 22, 2013, by Bill Coughlin of Woodland Park, New Jersey.

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Sep. 22, 2021