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Wagoner in Wagoner County, Oklahoma — The American South (West South Central)
 

Oklahoma Centennial Bench

 
 
Oklahoma Centennial Bench Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By William Fischer, Jr., July 22, 2013
1. Oklahoma Centennial Bench Marker
Inscription.  

The centennial bench is made of steel, like the people who have made Oklahoma what it is today. The bench is 100 inches long and there will be 100 of them produced. Each bench will come with a certificate of origin and number. The design is by metal artist James Murr and his wife Rose. The back of the bench tells the story of Oklahoma from 1907 thru 2007.

If you notice the line between 1907 and 2007 makes three significant dips, only to rise a little higher each time, and always with the sun shining on it. These signify three important events in Oklahoma history. The first is the crash of 29, the second is the dirty thirties, and the third is the bombing of the Murrah building. The people of Oklahoma are a hardy bunch, tough, and a whole lot plain stubborn. When the crash of 29 came a lot of people just gave up, but a true Okie does not know when to quit. Before anyone could get a grip on the fact that there was no money, no jobs, and most important, no food along came the drought of the thirties. What wasn't wiped out by the crash, either was blown away or covered up. The ones that had enough tenacity to stick it out are
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the ones that make Oklahoma what it is today. The bombing that took one hundred and sixty eight lives from us was a horrible thing we will never forget, but again thru the crying and tears those people of steel keep on keeping on making the rest of the country realize we are here to stay. May God continue to bless this great land and its people.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: DisastersEnvironmentNative AmericansSettlements & Settlers. A significant historical year for this entry is 1907.
 
Location. 35° 57.602′ N, 95° 22.647′ W. Marker is in Wagoner, Oklahoma, in Wagoner County. Marker is at the intersection of Cherokee Street (State Highway 51) and Main Street, on the right when traveling west on Cherokee Street. Marker is in Semore Park. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Wagoner OK 74467, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 9 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Semore Park (a few steps from this marker); Old City Hall & Fire Station (a few steps from this marker); World War II Memorial (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); Wagoner (about 800 feet away); Melvin "Buck" Garrison (approx. 0.2 miles away); Sam Powell and U.S. Court (approx. 0.2 miles away); Wagoner County Veterans Memorial
Oklahoma Centennial Bench and Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By William Fischer, Jr., July 22, 2013
2. Oklahoma Centennial Bench and Marker
(approx. 0.2 miles away); Texas Road (approx. 8.9 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Wagoner.
 
Oklahoma Centennial Benches and Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By William Fischer, Jr., July 22, 2013
3. Oklahoma Centennial Benches and Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 13, 2017. It was originally submitted on August 24, 2013, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 452 times since then and 21 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on August 24, 2013, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.

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Jun. 12, 2024