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Near Sharpsburg in Washington County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

First Army Corps

Phelps' Brigade, Doubleday's Division

 
 
Phelps' Brigade Tablet image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Swain, March 29, 2008
1. Phelps' Brigade Tablet
Inscription.  
U.S.A.
First Army Corps,
Phelps' Brigade, Doubleday's Division,

Col. Walter Phelps, 22d New York Infantry,
Commanding.
Organization.
22d, 24th, 30th and 84th New York Infantry,
and 2d U.S. Sharpshooters,
(September 17, 1862.)

Phelps' Brigade formed line at 5/30 a.m., on September 17, and moved in support of Gibbon's Brigade. When Gibbon deployed, 135 yards north of this in the cornfield and on the plateau west of the Hagerstown Pike, Phelps' Brigade, (425 officers and men) halted 25 paces in his rear, in the cornfield. After Gibbon advanced and became heavily engaged on both sides of the Pike, Phelps moved to the support of his left and fought on this ground. The subsequent movements of this brigade conformed to those of Gibbon. After heavy loss it retired to the fields north of D.R. Miller's and thence beyond the Poffenberger Lane.
 
Erected by Antietam Battlefield Board. (Marker Number 32.)
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: War, US Civil. In addition,
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it is included in the Antietam Campaign War Department Markers series list. A significant historical date for this entry is September 17, 1862.
 
Location. 39° 28.855′ N, 77° 44.822′ W. Marker is near Sharpsburg, Maryland, in Washington County. Marker is on Cornfield Avenue, on the right when traveling west. Located near stop four of the driving tour of Antietam Battlefield and stop six of the Cornfield walking trail. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Sharpsburg MD 21782, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. 84th New York (14th Brooklyn) Volunteer Infantry (a few steps from this marker); Hood's Division, Longstreet's Command (a few steps from this marker); Texas (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named Hood's Division, Longstreet's Command (a few steps from this marker); Longstreet's Command (within shouting distance of this marker); "Every Stalk of Corn" (within shouting distance of this marker); A Cornfield Unlike Any Other (within shouting distance of this marker); The Most Terrible Clash of Arms (within shouting distance of this marker); Jackson's Command (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Longstreet's Command (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Sharpsburg.
 
Also see . . .
First Army Corps Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Brian Scott, September 19, 2015
2. First Army Corps Marker

1. Antietam Battlefield. National Park Service site. (Submitted on April 2, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. 1st Brigade, 1st Division, I Corps. Discussing the action in the cornfield, Phelps would write, I ordered the brigade forward to the support of the line in front. The musketry fire at this point was very heavy, but the two brigades appeared to hold their position easily. (Submitted on April 2, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

3. Walter Phelps. Walter Phelps Jr. (1832–1878) was an officer in the Union Army throughout the American Civil War, ending the war as commanding general of the First Iron Brigade. (Submitted on October 20, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Tablet at Stop Four of the Tour image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Swain, March 29, 2008
3. Tablet at Stop Four of the Tour
First Army Corps Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Brian Scott, September 19, 2015
4. First Army Corps Marker
Colonel Walter Phelps (1832-1878) image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Brian Scott
5. Colonel Walter Phelps (1832-1878)
Phelps' Iron Brigade advanced through the cornfield early on the September 17 in close support of General John Gibbon's Iron Brigade. The 14th Brooklyn under his command helped the 6th Wisconsin Volunteers as a Confederate charge was about to push them back through the cornfield. Phelps' Brigade got the farthest during the action, the 14th Brooklyn being the only regiment to reach Dunkard Church and hold there waiting for reinforcements to arrive.
Phelps' Brigade Advance image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Swain, March 29, 2008
6. Phelps' Brigade Advance
Looking north from the tablet location. The Old Hagerstown Pike is today the Dunker Church Road, running on the left side of view. The cornfield stands behind the snake rail fence. Phelps's Brigade initially advanced on line, but behind, Gibbon's Brigade as the 1st Division, I Corps moved south with the Hagerstown Pike serving as their right guide. When Gibbon's Brigade came under fire, Phelps continued to support. Later with the arrival of Wofford's Confederates, both Federal brigades were forced back to the north of the cornfield.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 29, 2017. It was originally submitted on April 2, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,188 times since then and 14 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on April 2, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   2. submitted on October 20, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   3. submitted on April 2, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   4, 5. submitted on October 20, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   6. submitted on April 2, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.

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Apr. 22, 2024