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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Port Carbon in Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Schuylkill Canal

 
 
Schuylkill Canal Marker image. Click for full size.
By PaulwC3, August 3, 2013
1. Schuylkill Canal Marker
Inscription.  The 108-mile canal from Philadelphia linked this region's anthracite coal fields with industrial markets along the U.S. east coast. In 1828 the Schuylkill Navigation Company completed the canal to Port Carbon, which was its northern terminus until 1853.
 
Erected 1994 by Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission marker series.
 
Location. 40° 41.72′ N, 76° 9.989′ W. Marker is in Port Carbon, Pennsylvania, in Schuylkill County. Marker is at the intersection of Pike Street and Pine Street, on the right when traveling east on Pike Street. The marker is located in the Veterans Memorial Park next to the Janet Eich Library. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 111 Pike Street, Port Carbon PA 17965, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Veterans of Port Carbon (a few steps from this marker); Firth Dock (1828-1871) (approx. 0.4 miles away); Pottsville Maroons
Wide view of the Schuylkill Canal Marker image. Click for full size.
By PaulwC3, August 3, 2013
2. Wide view of the Schuylkill Canal Marker
(approx. 1.7 miles away); Schuylkill County (approx. 1.7 miles away); Molly Maguire Executions (approx. 1.8 miles away); Yuengling -America's Oldest Brewery (approx. 1.9 miles away); Spanish War Veterans (approx. 1.9 miles away); In Memory of the First Defenders and Nicholas Biddle (approx. 1.9 miles away).
 
Also see . . .  History of the Schuylkill Navigation System. The system was most prosperous between 1835 and 1841 although its record tonnage, nearly two million tons, occurred in 1859. During the second half of the 19th century the rise of the railroad, floods, droughts, and a miners' strike contributed to the downfall of the system. (Submitted on September 11, 2013, by PaulwC3 of Northern, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. Waterways & Vessels
 

More. Search the internet for Schuylkill Canal.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on September 10, 2013, by PaulwC3 of Northern, Virginia. This page has been viewed 515 times since then and 4 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on September 10, 2013, by PaulwC3 of Northern, Virginia.
 
Editor’s want-list for this marker. Photos of the ruins of at the northern terminus of the canal • Can you help?
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