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Braddock Heights in Frederick County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Braddock-Washington Monument

 
 
The Braddock-Washington Monument image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Devry Becker Jones (CC0), October 11, 2020
1. The Braddock-Washington Monument
Inscription.  In April 1755, Frederick Town was a planning center for a major campaign in the French and Indian War (175-1763). General Edward Braddock arrived from England and later 1,400 British Troops joined him to stop the French from taking land claimed by Britain. While in Frederick for twelve days, General Braddock met with several people including Maryland Proprietary Governor Horatio Sharpe, Benjamin Franklin, and Colonel George Washington. Washington joined with Braddock's command. In May 1755, the campaign pushed west through present day Old Braddock Road (US 40 Alt. ), toward Fort Duquesne in attempt to oust the French and their Indian allies.

The Frederick Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution originally placed this monument on July 10, 1924 three quarters of a mile to the east. Changes made to the highway over the years left the original site inaccessible. The Chapter relocated the monument here on August 25, 2009. This portion of General Braddock's route is part of "The National Old Trails Road".
 
Topics and series. This historical marker and monument is listed in these topic lists: Roads & Vehicles
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War, French and Indian. In addition, it is included in the Braddock’s Road and Maj. Gen. Edward Braddock, and the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) series lists. A significant historical month for this entry is April 1755.
 
Location. 39° 25.543′ N, 77° 30.342′ W. Marker is in Braddock Heights, Maryland, in Frederick County. Marker is on The Old National Pike (U.S. 40-Alt), on the right when traveling east. Marker is in a small pull-off on the west side of Braddock Mountain. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Middletown MD 21769, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. This Boulder Marks the National Trail (here, next to this marker); Hagan’s Tavern (approx. 0.7 miles away); Woodmere (approx. 1.9 miles away); General Edward Braddock (approx. 2.3 miles away); Charlie Keller (approx. 2.3 miles away); Christ Reformed Church (approx. 2.4 miles away); Memorial Hall (approx. 2.4 miles away); Middletown (approx. 2˝ miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Braddock Heights.
 
The Braddock-Washington Monument image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Devry Becker Jones (CC0), October 11, 2020
2. The Braddock-Washington Monument
The Braddock-Washington Monument image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Allen C. Browne, October 1, 2013
3. The Braddock-Washington Monument
This monument was dedicated on June 14, 1924. It was relocated in 1952 and moved again to this location in 2009.
Re-dedication Plaque image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Allen C. Browne, September 28, 2013
4. Re-dedication Plaque
General Braddock Monument
Re-dedicated October 11, 2009
by the Frederick Chapter
Daughters of the American Revolution
The Braddock-Washington Monument Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Allen C. Browne, January 17, 2009
5. The Braddock-Washington Monument Marker
The monument in its inaccessible location on the east flank of Braddock Mountain before it was moved to the west flank.
The Braddock-Washington Monument Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Allen C. Browne, January 17, 2009
6. The Braddock-Washington Monument Marker
The monument in its former location with steps blocked by the guardrail of US Route 40 Alternate.
Braddock Spring image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Allen C. Browne, January 17, 2009
7. Braddock Spring
The spring from which Washington may have drunk and near which the monument was originally located. This is one of the head springs of Ballenger Creek that enters the Monocacy at the Monocacy Battlefield.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 12, 2020. It was originally submitted on October 2, 2013, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 1,440 times since then and 25 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on October 12, 2020, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia.   3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on October 2, 2013, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.

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Feb. 24, 2024