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Lexington in Fayette County, Kentucky — The American South (East South Central)
 

Lexington

 
 
Lexington Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Ken Smith, July 12, 2012
1. Lexington Marker
Inscription.  The stallion Lexington was the key figure in development of the American Thoroughbred during the second half of the 19th Century. He was statistically the leading stallion in America for 14 consecutive years, 1861 - 1875, and again in two later years. A total of 16 years as the leading sire has never been duplicated in any major racing nation. He sired 84 horses of a quality to be regarded as stakes winners in modern terminology, and 11 of them were recognized as champions. This record was all the more remarkable because Lexington was at stud during the Civil War, when many of his sons and daughters were confiscated by the cavalries.

Lexington was bred by Dr. Elisha Warfield, a noted Kentucky Turfman of his day, and was born in 1850. He was a son of the sire Boston and the mare Alice Carneal. He was originally named Darley and was leased by Warfield to the African-American trainer Henry Brown. His early victories in Kentucky attracted the interest of Richard Ten Broeck, who formed a syndicate to purchase the horse. The name was changed to that of this city because he was to represent the state of Kentucky in the Great Post Stakes
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in New Orleans. Under the name of Lexington, he won that event and he had five other triumphs from a total of seven races, earning $56,600. Lexington, which had become virtually blind, stood at historic Woodburn Stud west of the city. His fee rose to $500, the highest in America at that time. Among his best son were Kentucky, Asteroid, Norfolk, Harry Bassett, Tom Bowling, and Duke of Magenta. Lexington's dominance is illustrated by his siring nine of the first 15 winners of the Travers Stakes at Saratoga.

Lexington died at 25 in 1875, and his skeleton was sent to the Smithsonian Institute in Washington, D.C.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: AnimalsEntertainmentSports. A significant historical year for this entry is 1861.
 
Location. 38° 2.503′ N, 84° 29.378′ W. Marker is in Lexington, Kentucky, in Fayette County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of East Main Street (U.S. 60) and Midland Avenue (U.S. 60), on the right when traveling west. Located in Thoroughbred Park. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 100 Midland Avenue, Lexington KY 40508, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. William S. Farish (a few steps from this marker); Robert A. Alexander (a few steps from this marker); George Washington (a few steps from this marker); John S. Knight
Lexington Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Ken Smith, July 12, 2012
2. Lexington Marker
(a few steps from this marker); William T. Young (a few steps from this marker); Sam Hildreth (a few steps from this marker); John W. Galbreath (a few steps from this marker); Samuel D. Riddle (a few steps from this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Lexington.
 
Lexington Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Ken Smith, July 12, 2012
3. Lexington Marker
Lexington Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Ken Smith, July 12, 2012
4. Lexington Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 29, 2020. It was originally submitted on August 11, 2012, by Ken Smith of Milan, Tennessee. This page has been viewed 612 times since then and 9 times this year. Last updated on November 25, 2013, by Ken Smith of Milan, Tennessee. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on August 11, 2012, by Ken Smith of Milan, Tennessee. • Al Wolf was the editor who published this page.

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Mar. 1, 2024