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Birmingham in Jefferson County, Alabama — The American South (East South Central)
 

Don't Tread on Me

March Route to Retail

 

— Birmingham Civil Rights Heritage Trail —

 
Don't Tread on Me 1963 Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Mark Hilton, December 5, 2021
1. Don't Tread on Me 1963 Marker
Inscription.  Leaders of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) learned they could apply economic pressure to White businesses with more effective results than moral persuasion alone. Therefore, the central strategy of the Birmingham Campaign targeted the City's retail base. "Project C" (the "C" stood for "confrontation") started with sit-ins at Birmingham lunch counters and continued with marches, pickets and boycotts of Birmingham retail stores. Movement leaders used these non-violent direct actions to disrupt White businesses and hurt their profit margins. The SCLC's goal was to create an economic crisis, forcing Whites to negotiate with Blacks who demanded equal rights and an end to segregation.

May 1963
A female protestor remains defiant as police drag her away from a demonstration in Birmingham's nearby retail district. Activists in Birmingham-led for seven years by Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth before the 1963 Birmingham Campaign-put their lives on the line to rebel against the City's unjust and unconstitutional segregation laws. One such law, City Code Section 369, said, "It shall be unlawful to conduct a restaurant in the
Don't Tread on Me 1963 Marker (paired marker) image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Mark Hilton
2. Don't Tread on Me 1963 Marker (paired marker)
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city at which White and Colored people are served in the same room...." Many Blacks march to the retail district to protest such laws with sit-ins and boycotts of downtown stores. There, some Whites spit on or verbally attack the protestors; but the non-violent protestors do not strike back.

"Get up, stand up, stand up for your rights."
Bob Marley
Musician and activist

Lesson B1: Explain the purpose of rules and laws. Do they apply equally to everyone?
 
Erected by the Birmingham Civil Rights Heritage Trail. (Marker Number B1.)
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: African AmericansCivil Rights. In addition, it is included in the Birmingham Civil Rights Heritage Trail series list. A significant historical month for this entry is May 1963.
 
Location. 33° 30.989′ N, 86° 48.856′ W. Marker is in Birmingham, Alabama, in Jefferson County. Marker is at the intersection of 6th Avenue North and 17th Street North on 6th Avenue North. Located at the NE corner of Kelly Ingram Park. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Birmingham AL 35203, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. (here, next to this marker); Jim Crow on the Books (a few steps from this marker); Birmingham Civil Rights Institute
Don't Tread on Me 1963 Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Mark Hilton, December 5, 2021
3. Don't Tread on Me 1963 Marker
(a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. (a few steps from this marker); Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth (within shouting distance of this marker); The Children's Crusade (within shouting distance of this marker); Police Presence (within shouting distance of this marker); Selective Buying Campaign (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Birmingham.
 
Regarding Don't Tread on Me. The Civil Rights Activist Committee “Home of the Foot Soldiers“ is the Information Center for the Birmingham Civil Rights Heritage Trail.
 
Don't Tread on Me Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Bill Pfingsten, April 5, 2014
4. Don't Tread on Me Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 8, 2022. It was originally submitted on April 16, 2014, by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland. This page has been viewed 617 times since then and 33 times this year. Last updated on April 16, 2014, by Keith S Smith of West Chester, Pennsylvania. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on December 5, 2021, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.   4. submitted on April 16, 2014, by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland.

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May. 22, 2022