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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Fort Stockton in Pecos County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Tunis Creek Stage Coach Stop

 
 
Tunis Creek Stage Coach Stop Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney, April 13, 2014
1. Tunis Creek Stage Coach Stop Marker
Inscription.  Replica of San Antonio and San Diego overland stage coach stop. This building was constructed of the stone from the original site which is ½ mile south-east of this location near Tunis Springs. The remains of a large Comanche Indian camp still exist at the original site. The state line was in use in the years of 1879 and 1880 and was abandoned in 1881 when the T&P railroad was constructed into El Paso.
 
Erected 1936 by Texas Highway Department.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Native AmericansRailroads & StreetcarsRoads & Vehicles. In addition, it is included in the Comanche Trail into Mexico, the San Antonio-El Paso Road, and the Texas 1936 Centennial Markers and Monuments series lists.
 
Location. 30° 51.622′ N, 102° 32.974′ W. Marker is in Fort Stockton, Texas, in Pecos County. Marker is on Interstate 10 2 miles east of Farm to Market Road 2023, on the right when traveling east. Marker is located in a picnic area pull over. Touch for map
Tunis Creek Stage Coach Stop Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney, April 13, 2014
2. Tunis Creek Stage Coach Stop Marker
Marker can be seen on building.
. Marker is in this post office area: Fort Stockton TX 79735, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Related marker. Click here for another marker that is related to this marker. Another Comanche campsite in nearby Fort Stockton.
 
Additional comments.
1. Tunas Springs
"Tunis" is probably a corruption of the word "Tunas". The springs are alternatively known as "Tunas Springs", "Tuna" being fruit produced by prickly pear cactus and a staple food of Indians of Texas. See Major and Historical Springs of Texas, Gunnar Brune, a report to the Texas Water Development Board.
    — Submitted April 27, 2014, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas.

2. Comanche Land and Ever Has Been
For how the springs (Tunas Springs) fit into the bigger picture of Comanche lands, see "Comanche Land and Ever Has Been": A Native Geography of the Nineteenth-Century Comanchería, Author(s): Daniel J. Gelo, Source: The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Vol. 103, No. 3 (Jan., 2000)
    — Submitted April 27, 2014, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas.
 
Looking North image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney
3. Looking North
Panorama from behind building and marker, looking north
View South image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney, April 13, 2014
4. View South
View south, in direction of Tunis Springs.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. It was originally submitted on April 27, 2014, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas. This page has been viewed 665 times since then and 60 times this year. Last updated on April 28, 2014, by Keith S Smith of West Chester, Pennsylvania. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on April 27, 2014, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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Sep. 18, 2020