Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Huntington in Cabell County, West Virginia — The American South (Appalachia)
 

Madie Carroll House

Saved from Destruction

 
 
Madie Carroll House Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Don Morfe, April 14, 2014
1. Madie Carroll House Marker
Inscription.  During the Civil War, this was the home of Mary Carroll, who narrowly managed to save it from destruction when much of Guyandotte was burned on November 11, 1861.

After capturing the town on November 10, 1861, and rounding up civilian Unionists and Federal recruits, Confederates forces under Col. John Clarkson and Col. Albert G. Jenkins left Guyandotte with their prisoners the next day. As they departed, the steamboat Boston arrived with the 5th (West) Virginia Infantry. When the Federals disembarked, they heard stories of an alleged “massacre” and that pro-secessionist residents had assisted the Confederate cavalrymen. The regiment’s commander, Col. John L. Zeigler, is believed to have ordered Guyandotte burned in retaliation.

There are two accounts of how Mary Carroll saved her home. One is that she barricaded herself and her children in the brick kitchen and refused to come out. The other is that she went out into the street and pleaded with the soldiers not to burn her house because her husband was ill inside.

The frustrated soldiers burned the barn at the rear of the house, unaware that
Madie Carroll House Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Don Morfe, April 14, 2014
2. Madie Carroll House Marker
Click or scan to see
this page online
the 9th (West) Virginia Infantry had stored supplies in it. In 1892, Mary Carroll filed a claim with the Federal government to be reimbursed for the loss of the barn and a small dwelling located elsewhere.

(sidebar)
The house was floated down the Ohio River from Gallipolis, Ohio, on a flatboat in 1810. Thomas and Mary Carroll bought it in 1855. Later, it was used as the first Catholic church in Cabell County. The current barn is a replica of an antebellum barn.

(captions)
(lower left) Madie Carroll pleading for her house Courtesy the artist Debra Richardson
(upper right) Burning of Madie Carroll’s barn Courtesy the artist Debra Richardson
 
Erected by West Virginia Civil War Trails.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: War, US CivilWomen. In addition, it is included in the West Virginia Civil War Trails series list. A significant historical month for this entry is November 1579.
 
Location. 38° 25.726′ N, 82° 23.413′ W. Marker is in Huntington, West Virginia, in Cabell County. Marker is on Guyan Street north of 5th Avenue, on the left when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 234 Guyan Street, Huntington WV 25702, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Historic Carroll House (here, next to this marker); Granville Parker
Madie Carroll House-Painting on wall across the street image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Don Morfe, April 14, 2014
3. Madie Carroll House-Painting on wall across the street
(here, next to this marker); Battle of Guyandotte (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named Battle of Guyandotte (a few steps from this marker); Raid on Guyandotte / Burning of Guyandotte (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); First Cabell County Court House (about 500 feet away); John S. Witcher (approx. 0.2 miles away); Guyandotte (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Huntington.
 
Also see . . .  The Madie Carroll House Preservation Society, Inc. (Submitted on May 14, 2014.)
 
Madie Carroll House Marker at Heritage Park image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Don Morfe, April 14, 2014
4. Madie Carroll House Marker at Heritage Park
This copy of the marker is located in the B&O Museum in Heritage Park, Huntington--It had an error and was not used.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 29, 2021. It was originally submitted on May 14, 2014, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Maryland. This page has been viewed 726 times since then and 45 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on May 14, 2014, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Maryland.   4. submitted on May 15, 2014, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Maryland. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.

Share this page.  
Share on Tumblr
m=73708

Paid Advertisements
 
 

May. 29, 2022