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Druid Hill Park in Baltimore, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Druid Hill

Strategic Union Encampment

 
 
Druid Hill Marker image. Click for full size.
By Christopher Busta-Peck, May 4, 2008
1. Druid Hill Marker
Inscription.  
Within a year of the April 1861 Baltimore Riots, the first of several U.S. Army camps and fortifications began encircling Druid Hill, and important location high above the city and adjacent to the Northern Central Railroad. The 114th and 150th New York Infantry Regiments occupied Camp Belger (Fort No. 5) here, named for Col. James Belger, quartermaster for of the Middle Department headquartered in Baltimore , March 1862. At least fifteen regiments eventually encamped here near the intersection of Madison and North Avenues, in the shadow of the park's main gates.

In July 1863, Druid Hill became known as Camp Birney, after Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton assigned Gen. William Birney, son of an abolitionist, to recruit African Americans for U.S. Colored Troops (USCT) regiments. Birney freed 16 shackled slaves from a Pratt Street slave pen when they promised to enlist. He also organized the 7th USCT here, as well as the 4th and 39th USCTs in 1864. The most notable member of the 4th USCT was college-educated Sgt. Maj. Christian Abraham Fleetwood, born free in Baltimore on July 21, 1840. He enlisted on August 17, 1863, and was one
Marker, with the old Druid Hill Park gates in the background image. Click for full size.
By Christopher Busta-Peck, May 4, 2008
2. Marker, with the old Druid Hill Park gates in the background
Click or scan to see
this page online
of 14 USCTs awared the Medal of Honor for heroism in the Battle of Chaffin's Farm near Richmond, Virginia.

[sidebar]
At the October 1860 ceremonies opening 745-acre Druid Hill Park, Mayor Thomas Swann said, "We are here to proclaim the equality of rights to all, and to dedicate this park, now and forever, to the people of this great city." Fast-growing Baltimore had burgeoning industry, a majority foreign-born population, and the largest number of urban free blacks in the country. Druid Hill, funded by taxing privately owned horse-drawn railways, was the nation's third large urban "country park" after New York's Central Park (1858) and Philadelphia's Fairmount Park (1859).
 
Erected by Maryland Civil War Trails.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: African AmericansWar, US Civil. In addition, it is included in the Maryland Civil War Trails, and the Medal of Honor Recipients series lists. A significant historical year for this entry is 1861.
 
Location. 39° 18.946′ N, 76° 38.444′ W. Marker is in Druid Hill Park in Baltimore, Maryland. Marker is at the intersection of Swann Drive and Druid Park Lake Drive, on the right when traveling north on Swann Drive. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 2600 Madison Ave, Baltimore MD 21217, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within
View from the marker to the Druid Hill Reservoir image. Click for full size.
By Christopher Busta-Peck, May 4, 2008
3. View from the marker to the Druid Hill Reservoir
walking distance of this marker. Towers, Gates & Pavilions (within shouting distance of this marker); This Panel by John Monroe (within shouting distance of this marker); These Citizens by Subscribing for the Park Stock in 1860 (within shouting distance of this marker); Eli Siegel (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Emersonian Apartments (about 600 feet away); William Wallace (about 600 feet away); The Esplanade (about 600 feet away); A Memorial Rose Garden (approx. 0.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Druid Hill Park.
 
More about this marker. A drawing of Camp Belger, Baltimore, Md., 114th Regiment New York Volunteers Courtesy Maryland Historical Society is on the lower left of the marker. The upper center contains a photograph of the Druid Hill Park entrance gateway, circa 1875, credited to the Maryland Historical Society. The marker also displays portraits of Gen. William Birney, Christian A. Fleetwood, and Thomas Swann (in the sidebar).
 
Also see . . .  Camp Belger / Belger Barracks. Lithographs of, and links to letters from, Camp Belger during the Civil War. The web site is part of that dedicated to the 150th Regiment, New York Infantry, mentioned on the marker. (Submitted on September 18, 2008.) 
 
Thomas Swann image. Click for full size.
Library of Congress
4. Thomas Swann
At the October 1860 ceremonies opening 745-acre Druid Hill Park, Mayor Thomas Swann said, “We are here to proclaim the equality of rights to all, and to dedicate this park, now and forever, to the people of this great city.” Fast-growing Baltimore had burgeoning industry, a majority foreign-born population, and the largest number of urban free blacks in the country. Druid Hill, funded by taxing privately owned horse-drawn railways, was the nation's third large urban "country park" after New York's Central Park (1858) and Philadelphia's Fairmount Park (1859).
from Brady-Handy photograph collection, between between 1865 and 1880.
Brevet Major General William Birney image. Click for full size.
Library of Congress
5. Brevet Major General William Birney
Between 1861 and 1865
Sergeant Major Christian Fleetwood image. Click for full size.
By National Museum U.S. Army
6. Sergeant Major Christian Fleetwood
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 20, 2021. It was originally submitted on May 4, 2008, by Christopher Busta-Peck of Shaker Heights, Ohio. This page has been viewed 3,674 times since then and 56 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on May 4, 2008, by Christopher Busta-Peck of Shaker Heights, Ohio.   4, 5, 6. submitted on September 14, 2020, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.

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May. 17, 2021