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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Woodside in Montgomery County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Confederate Monument

 
 
Confederate Monument Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Allen C. Browne, August 31, 2008
1. Confederate Monument Marker
Inscription.  
To the Memory of
→•←
Seventeen
— Unknown —
Confederate Dead,
Who Fell in Front of
Washington, D.C.
July 12, 1864.
— By Their —
Comrades.

 
Erected 1897.
 
Topics. This monument and memorial is listed in these topic lists: Cemeteries & Burial SitesWar, US Civil.
 
Location. This marker has been replaced by another marker nearby. It was located near 39° 0.319′ N, 77° 2.27′ W. Marker was in Woodside, Maryland, in Montgomery County. Memorial was at the intersection of Georgia Avenue (Maryland Route 97) and Grace Church Road, on the right when traveling north on Georgia Avenue. Marker is in the church yard of Grace Episcopal Church. Touch for map. Marker was at or near this postal address: 1607 Grace Church Rd, Silver Spring MD 20910, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this location. Indonesia Muslim Association in America (IMAAM) Center (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); MARC Train #286 (approx. 0.4 miles away); Xeriscape Demonstration Project
Confederate Monument Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Allen C. Browne, February 23, 2005
2. Confederate Monument Marker
Click or scan to see
this page online
(approx. half a mile away); Original Federal Boundary Stone, District of Columbia, North Cornerstone (approx. 0.7 miles away); Eugenie Clark (approx. 0.7 miles away); William Osler (approx. 0.7 miles away); Ellen Stofan (approx. 0.7 miles away); J. Craig Venter (approx. 0.7 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Woodside.
 
Regarding Confederate Monument. These 17 confederates were originally buried in scattered locations around Silver Spring. In 1874 they were re-interred in cemetery space donated by Montgomery Blair. This monument was erected in 1897 when the 17 confederate graves were moved again to make way for a street-car track running along Georgia Avenue.
 
Grace Episcopal Church image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Allen C. Browne, February 23, 2005
3. Grace Episcopal Church
This brick building replaced the wooden church in 1956.
Postcard image. Click for full size.
4. Postcard
This postcard shows the wood shingled building in front of which the monument was erected in 1897.
ACB Collection
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 18, 2021. It was originally submitted on August 6, 2014, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 573 times since then and 4 times this year. Last updated on August 6, 2014, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on August 6, 2014, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.

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May. 24, 2022