Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Fort Lee in Bergen County, New Jersey — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Fort Lee Road

 
 
Fort Lee Road Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Bill Coughlin, April 25, 2008
1. Fort Lee Road Marker
Inscription.  
Fort Lee Road (Main Street) was the main roadway to General Washington’s Headquarters in Hackensack. Supplies and men were in constant movement on the road to re-supply Fort Washington in New York. The Continental Army began it’s “Retreat to Victory” on this road. Its link to the New Bridge Crossing on the Hackensack River saved the Continental Army from capture. This would have ended the War for Independence.
 
Erected 2004 by Borough of Fort Lee.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Roads & VehiclesWar, US Revolutionary. In addition, it is included in the Former U.S. Presidents: #01 George Washington series list.
 
Location. 40° 50.933′ N, 73° 58.101′ W. Marker is in Fort Lee, New Jersey, in Bergen County. Marker is at the intersection of Angioletti Place and Parker Ave, on the right when traveling east on Angioletti Place. Marker is at Monument Park, at the southwest corner of the Angioletti Place and Parker Avenue intersection. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Fort Lee NJ 07024, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers.
Paid Advertisement
Click on the ad for more information.
Please report objectionable advertising to the Editor.
Click or scan to see
this page online
At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Old Army Road (here, next to this marker); Liberty Tree Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); Soldiers of the American Revolution (within shouting distance of this marker); General Henry Knox (within shouting distance of this marker); General Horatio Gates (within shouting distance of this marker); Thomas Paine (within shouting distance of this marker); General John “Black Jack” Pershing (within shouting distance of this marker); General George Washington (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Fort Lee.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. This set of markers is located in Fort Lee’s Monument Park.
 
Also see . . .
1. Washington's Retreat Through Jersey. General Atomic website entry (Submitted on May 7, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of Woodland Park, New Jersey.) 

2. Battle of Fort Washington. Revolutionary War website entry (Submitted on September 1, 2021, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York.) 
 
Marker at Monument Park image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Bill Coughlin, April 25, 2008
2. Marker at Monument Park
At this entrance to Monument Park, the Fort Lee Road marker is on the pillar to the right. Monument Park is the site of Continental Army encampment in 1776.
Soldiers of the American Revolution Monument image. Click for more information.
Photographed By Bill Coughlin, April 25, 2008
3. Soldiers of the American Revolution Monument
Monument Park, where the Continental Army camped during the Battle of New York, is home to a number of markers and monuments.
Click for more information.
Fort Lee Road image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Bill Coughlin, April 25, 2008
4. Fort Lee Road
This is the road from Fort Lee to Washington's Hackensack headquarters. The view is east, towards Fort Lee.
Washington's Retreat image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Bill Coughlin, April 25, 2008
5. Washington's Retreat
This is Fort Lee Road looking west, in the directon that Gen. Washington and the Continental Army marched on their retreat from Fort Lee.
New Bridge Crossing image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Bill Coughlin, April 19, 2008
6. New Bridge Crossing
During their retreat from Fort Lee, the Continental Army crossed the Hackensack River at this location. They burned the wooden bridge after the crossing to slow British pursuit.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 7, 2021. It was originally submitted on May 7, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of Woodland Park, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 3,026 times since then and 32 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on May 7, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of Woodland Park, New Jersey. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page.

Share this page.  
Share on Tumblr
m=7657

CeraNet Cloud Computing sponsors the Historical Marker Database.
This website earns income from purchases you make after using our links to Amazon.com. We appreciate your support.
Paid Advertisement
May. 23, 2024